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Neural biomarkers for assessing different types of imagery in pictorial health warning labels for cigarette packaging: a cross-sectional study.

Newman-Norlund RD, Thrasher JF, Fridriksson J, Brixius W, Froeliger B, Hammond D, Cummings MK - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Pictorial HWL stimuli elicited activation in a broad network of brain areas associated with visual processing and emotion.Self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs are correlated with neural responses in brain areas associated with visual and emotional processing.Study results cross-validate self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs and provide insights into how pictorial HWLs are processed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

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Behavioral effectiveness ratings of health warning labels (HWLs). All participants rated all HWLs prior to functional MRI (fMRI) scanning by responding to the question: “How much does this warning make you feel afraid?” ***Significant p<0.001 (within subjects one-tailed t test); error bars represent SEM.
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BMJOPEN2014006411F2: Behavioral effectiveness ratings of health warning labels (HWLs). All participants rated all HWLs prior to functional MRI (fMRI) scanning by responding to the question: “How much does this warning make you feel afraid?” ***Significant p<0.001 (within subjects one-tailed t test); error bars represent SEM.

Mentions: Responses to the emotional arousal and perceived effectiveness questions were highly correlated for the graphic (r (49)=0.87), suffering (r (49)=0.90) and symbolic (r (49)=0.90) stimuli. Because ratings of emotionality were the most relevant for interpretation of our results, we focus on those scores in our analysis section. When the same analyses were conducted using perceived effectiveness, we obtained a similar pattern of results (ie, graphic>suffering>symbolic; figure 2).


Neural biomarkers for assessing different types of imagery in pictorial health warning labels for cigarette packaging: a cross-sectional study.

Newman-Norlund RD, Thrasher JF, Fridriksson J, Brixius W, Froeliger B, Hammond D, Cummings MK - BMJ Open (2014)

Behavioral effectiveness ratings of health warning labels (HWLs). All participants rated all HWLs prior to functional MRI (fMRI) scanning by responding to the question: “How much does this warning make you feel afraid?” ***Significant p<0.001 (within subjects one-tailed t test); error bars represent SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4281542&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006411F2: Behavioral effectiveness ratings of health warning labels (HWLs). All participants rated all HWLs prior to functional MRI (fMRI) scanning by responding to the question: “How much does this warning make you feel afraid?” ***Significant p<0.001 (within subjects one-tailed t test); error bars represent SEM.
Mentions: Responses to the emotional arousal and perceived effectiveness questions were highly correlated for the graphic (r (49)=0.87), suffering (r (49)=0.90) and symbolic (r (49)=0.90) stimuli. Because ratings of emotionality were the most relevant for interpretation of our results, we focus on those scores in our analysis section. When the same analyses were conducted using perceived effectiveness, we obtained a similar pattern of results (ie, graphic>suffering>symbolic; figure 2).

Bottom Line: Pictorial HWL stimuli elicited activation in a broad network of brain areas associated with visual processing and emotion.Self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs are correlated with neural responses in brain areas associated with visual and emotional processing.Study results cross-validate self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs and provide insights into how pictorial HWLs are processed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus