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Sequential coordination between lingual and pharyngeal pressures produced during dry swallowing.

Yano J, Aoyagi Y, Ono T, Hori K, Yamaguchi W, Fujiwara S, Kumakura I, Minagi S, Tsubahara A - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: The peak of TP did not show significant differences with the onset of PP, and it was earlier than that of PP.There was no significant difference between the offset of TP and PP.These results could be interpreted as providing an explanation for the generation of oropharyngeal pressure flow to ensure efficient bolus transport and safe swallowing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Therapy, Rehabilitation Center, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0114, Japan ; Department of Occlusal and Oral Functional Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-4 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8525, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate oropharyngeal pressure flow dynamics during dry swallowing in ten healthy subjects. Tongue pressure (TP) was measured using a sensor sheet system with five measuring points on the hard palate, and pharyngeal pressure (PP) was measured using a manometric catheter with four measuring points. The order and correlations of sequential events, such as onset, peak, and offset times of pressure production, at each pressure measuring point were analyzed on the synchronized waveforms. Onset of TP was earlier than that of PP. The peak of TP did not show significant differences with the onset of PP, and it was earlier than that of PP. There was no significant difference between the offset of TP and PP. The onset of PP was temporally time-locked to the peak of TP, and there was an especially strong correlation between the onset of PP and TP at the posterior-median part on the hard palate. The offset of PP was temporally time-locked to that of TP. These results could be interpreted as providing an explanation for the generation of oropharyngeal pressure flow to ensure efficient bolus transport and safe swallowing.

Show MeSH
Typical waves of simultaneous recording of tongue (TChs 1–5) and pharyngeal (PChs 2–4) pressures.
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fig2: Typical waves of simultaneous recording of tongue (TChs 1–5) and pharyngeal (PChs 2–4) pressures.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows typical waves of a simultaneous recording of tongue (TChs 1–5) and pharyngeal (PChs 2–4) pressures. Because the most proximal pharyngeal sensor, PCh 1, was highly variable individually in timing at peak pressure, it was excluded from the analysis in this study. The timings of onset, peak, and offset of tongue and pharyngeal pressures were measured on the waveform of each recording offline (Figure 3). Since PCh 4 was positioned at the upper portion of the UES, onset was defined as the timing at the highest pressure just before the pressure drop due to UES relaxation. The offset of PCh 4 was defined as the timing at the highest pressure just after the pressure drop.


Sequential coordination between lingual and pharyngeal pressures produced during dry swallowing.

Yano J, Aoyagi Y, Ono T, Hori K, Yamaguchi W, Fujiwara S, Kumakura I, Minagi S, Tsubahara A - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Typical waves of simultaneous recording of tongue (TChs 1–5) and pharyngeal (PChs 2–4) pressures.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4281446&req=5

fig2: Typical waves of simultaneous recording of tongue (TChs 1–5) and pharyngeal (PChs 2–4) pressures.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows typical waves of a simultaneous recording of tongue (TChs 1–5) and pharyngeal (PChs 2–4) pressures. Because the most proximal pharyngeal sensor, PCh 1, was highly variable individually in timing at peak pressure, it was excluded from the analysis in this study. The timings of onset, peak, and offset of tongue and pharyngeal pressures were measured on the waveform of each recording offline (Figure 3). Since PCh 4 was positioned at the upper portion of the UES, onset was defined as the timing at the highest pressure just before the pressure drop due to UES relaxation. The offset of PCh 4 was defined as the timing at the highest pressure just after the pressure drop.

Bottom Line: The peak of TP did not show significant differences with the onset of PP, and it was earlier than that of PP.There was no significant difference between the offset of TP and PP.These results could be interpreted as providing an explanation for the generation of oropharyngeal pressure flow to ensure efficient bolus transport and safe swallowing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Therapy, Rehabilitation Center, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki, Okayama 701-0114, Japan ; Department of Occlusal and Oral Functional Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-4 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8525, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to investigate oropharyngeal pressure flow dynamics during dry swallowing in ten healthy subjects. Tongue pressure (TP) was measured using a sensor sheet system with five measuring points on the hard palate, and pharyngeal pressure (PP) was measured using a manometric catheter with four measuring points. The order and correlations of sequential events, such as onset, peak, and offset times of pressure production, at each pressure measuring point were analyzed on the synchronized waveforms. Onset of TP was earlier than that of PP. The peak of TP did not show significant differences with the onset of PP, and it was earlier than that of PP. There was no significant difference between the offset of TP and PP. The onset of PP was temporally time-locked to the peak of TP, and there was an especially strong correlation between the onset of PP and TP at the posterior-median part on the hard palate. The offset of PP was temporally time-locked to that of TP. These results could be interpreted as providing an explanation for the generation of oropharyngeal pressure flow to ensure efficient bolus transport and safe swallowing.

Show MeSH