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Assessing the Effect of Composting Cassava Peel Based Substrates on the Yield, Nutritional Quality, and Physical Characteristics of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer.

Kortei NK, Dzogbefia VP, Obodai M - Biotechnol Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Cap diameter and stipe length differed significantly (P < 0.05) with the compost heights (0.8 m and 1.5 m).Based on the findings an interaction of 1.5 m compost height and 5 days composting period on cassava peels and corncobs (1 : 1 ratio) with chicken manure produced the best results.The nutritional quality of the mushrooms also differed significantly (P < 0.05), indicating that cassava peels could be used as a possible substrate in cultivation of mushroom.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Agriculture and Radiation Processing, Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 80, Legon, Ghana.

ABSTRACT
Cassava peel based substrate formulations as an alternative substrate were used to grow mushrooms. The effect of two compost heights, three composting periods on the mycelia growth, physical characteristics, yield, and nutritional qualities of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer was studied. Mean mycelia growth of 16.2 cm after a period of seven (7) weeks was the best for 1.5 m compost height. Cap diameter and stipe length differed significantly (P < 0.05) with the compost heights (0.8 m and 1.5 m). The yield on compost height of 1.5 m, composted for 5 days, differed significantly (P < 0.05) from that of 0.8 m and gave increasing yields as follows: cassava peels and manure, cassava peels only, cassava peels and corn cobs (1 : 1 ratio), and cassava peels and corn cobs (1 : 1 ratio) with chicken manure. Composting periods (3 and 7 days) gave varying yields depending on the compost height. Based on the findings an interaction of 1.5 m compost height and 5 days composting period on cassava peels and corncobs (1 : 1 ratio) with chicken manure produced the best results. The nutritional quality of the mushrooms also differed significantly (P < 0.05), indicating that cassava peels could be used as a possible substrate in cultivation of mushroom.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Weekly mycelial growth on substrates of 1.5 m compost height and 3 days' composting period.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Weekly mycelial growth on substrates of 1.5 m compost height and 3 days' composting period.

Mentions: The various substrate combinations and composting treatments (Table 1) resulted in different growth responses due to the relative distribution of nutrients. Mycelial growth was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by compost height, composting period, substrate combination, and supplementation (Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6). Higher compost heights and longer composting periods provided sufficient temperatures for microbial activities which allowed for greater decomposition of polysaccharides into smaller units for usage by microorganisms and mushroom mycelia. This was evident in producing the longest mycelia length of 16.3 cm on ncmcc (50% cassava peels + 50% corncobs + no chicken manure) of 5 days' composting period and 1.5 m height at the end of the seventh (7th) week of incubation (Figure 5). The shortest mycelia length of 8.1 cm was recorded by 100% cassava peels composted for 3 days of 0.8 m height (Figure 1). Generally, cm and ncm (100% cassava peels + chicken manure and 100% cassava peels + no chicken manure, resp.) and their interactions performed poorly. Conversely, mixture of cassava peels and corncobs (1 : 1 ratio) and its interactions supported good mycelia growth perhaps because of its porosity and high proportion of cellulose [37]. Mixtures of various agricultural wastes have been reported by Akinyele and Adetuyi [38] to give good yields of mushroom mycelia. Additionally, this substrate mixture possesses a better C/N ratio of about 159.12 compared to the C/N ratio of cassava peels (Table 2) [28]. This agrees with the findings of Mantovani et al. [39] who reported that greater C/N ratios promoted good fungal growth as they investigated the effect of the addition of nitrogen sources to cassava fiber and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios on fungal growth.


Assessing the Effect of Composting Cassava Peel Based Substrates on the Yield, Nutritional Quality, and Physical Characteristics of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer.

Kortei NK, Dzogbefia VP, Obodai M - Biotechnol Res Int (2014)

Weekly mycelial growth on substrates of 1.5 m compost height and 3 days' composting period.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4281436&req=5

fig4: Weekly mycelial growth on substrates of 1.5 m compost height and 3 days' composting period.
Mentions: The various substrate combinations and composting treatments (Table 1) resulted in different growth responses due to the relative distribution of nutrients. Mycelial growth was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by compost height, composting period, substrate combination, and supplementation (Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6). Higher compost heights and longer composting periods provided sufficient temperatures for microbial activities which allowed for greater decomposition of polysaccharides into smaller units for usage by microorganisms and mushroom mycelia. This was evident in producing the longest mycelia length of 16.3 cm on ncmcc (50% cassava peels + 50% corncobs + no chicken manure) of 5 days' composting period and 1.5 m height at the end of the seventh (7th) week of incubation (Figure 5). The shortest mycelia length of 8.1 cm was recorded by 100% cassava peels composted for 3 days of 0.8 m height (Figure 1). Generally, cm and ncm (100% cassava peels + chicken manure and 100% cassava peels + no chicken manure, resp.) and their interactions performed poorly. Conversely, mixture of cassava peels and corncobs (1 : 1 ratio) and its interactions supported good mycelia growth perhaps because of its porosity and high proportion of cellulose [37]. Mixtures of various agricultural wastes have been reported by Akinyele and Adetuyi [38] to give good yields of mushroom mycelia. Additionally, this substrate mixture possesses a better C/N ratio of about 159.12 compared to the C/N ratio of cassava peels (Table 2) [28]. This agrees with the findings of Mantovani et al. [39] who reported that greater C/N ratios promoted good fungal growth as they investigated the effect of the addition of nitrogen sources to cassava fiber and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios on fungal growth.

Bottom Line: Cap diameter and stipe length differed significantly (P < 0.05) with the compost heights (0.8 m and 1.5 m).Based on the findings an interaction of 1.5 m compost height and 5 days composting period on cassava peels and corncobs (1 : 1 ratio) with chicken manure produced the best results.The nutritional quality of the mushrooms also differed significantly (P < 0.05), indicating that cassava peels could be used as a possible substrate in cultivation of mushroom.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Agriculture and Radiation Processing, Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 80, Legon, Ghana.

ABSTRACT
Cassava peel based substrate formulations as an alternative substrate were used to grow mushrooms. The effect of two compost heights, three composting periods on the mycelia growth, physical characteristics, yield, and nutritional qualities of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer was studied. Mean mycelia growth of 16.2 cm after a period of seven (7) weeks was the best for 1.5 m compost height. Cap diameter and stipe length differed significantly (P < 0.05) with the compost heights (0.8 m and 1.5 m). The yield on compost height of 1.5 m, composted for 5 days, differed significantly (P < 0.05) from that of 0.8 m and gave increasing yields as follows: cassava peels and manure, cassava peels only, cassava peels and corn cobs (1 : 1 ratio), and cassava peels and corn cobs (1 : 1 ratio) with chicken manure. Composting periods (3 and 7 days) gave varying yields depending on the compost height. Based on the findings an interaction of 1.5 m compost height and 5 days composting period on cassava peels and corncobs (1 : 1 ratio) with chicken manure produced the best results. The nutritional quality of the mushrooms also differed significantly (P < 0.05), indicating that cassava peels could be used as a possible substrate in cultivation of mushroom.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus