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Oral foregut cyst in the ventral tongue: a case report.

Kwak EJ, Jung YS, Park HS, Jung HD - J Korean Assoc Oral Maxillofac Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: The exact etiology has not been fully identified, but it is thought to arise from misplaced primitive foregut.This lesion develops asymptomatically but sometimes causes difficulty in swallowing and pronunciation depending on its size.Surgeons associated with head and neck pathology should include the oral foregut cyst in the differential diagnosis for ranula, dermoid cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst and lymphangioma in cases of pediatric head and neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
An oral foregut cyst is a rare congenital choristoma lined by the respiratory and/or gastrointestinal epithelium. The exact etiology has not been fully identified, but it is thought to arise from misplaced primitive foregut. This lesion develops asymptomatically but sometimes causes difficulty in swallowing and pronunciation depending on its size. Thus, the first choice of treatment is surgical excision. Surgeons associated with head and neck pathology should include the oral foregut cyst in the differential diagnosis for ranula, dermoid cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst and lymphangioma in cases of pediatric head and neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Ciliated columnar epithelium was seen (H&E staining, ×200). B. Goblet cell responded positively to a periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining (×400).
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Figure 3: A. Ciliated columnar epithelium was seen (H&E staining, ×200). B. Goblet cell responded positively to a periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining (×400).

Mentions: The surgical procedure proceeded as follows. Under general anesthesia with nasoendotracheal intubation, the patient was placed on the operating table in supine position. Intraoral irrigation, extraoral preparation, and draping were done in the usual manner. After local injection with 2% lidocaine on the ventral tongue, a vertical incision was performed along the lingual frenulum, and dissection of the mass was carefully performed. The dissection process was fairly straightforward because the cystic wall was relatively firm compared with other odontogenic cysts, and an oval-shaped mass was removed.(Fig. 2) The specimen was sent to the department of oral pathology. It was found to consist of ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, the origin of which was considered to be respiratory epithelium.(Fig. 3. A) The healing process in this case was very good and without complications such as infection and wound dehiscence.


Oral foregut cyst in the ventral tongue: a case report.

Kwak EJ, Jung YS, Park HS, Jung HD - J Korean Assoc Oral Maxillofac Surg (2014)

A. Ciliated columnar epithelium was seen (H&E staining, ×200). B. Goblet cell responded positively to a periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining (×400).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279972&req=5

Figure 3: A. Ciliated columnar epithelium was seen (H&E staining, ×200). B. Goblet cell responded positively to a periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining (×400).
Mentions: The surgical procedure proceeded as follows. Under general anesthesia with nasoendotracheal intubation, the patient was placed on the operating table in supine position. Intraoral irrigation, extraoral preparation, and draping were done in the usual manner. After local injection with 2% lidocaine on the ventral tongue, a vertical incision was performed along the lingual frenulum, and dissection of the mass was carefully performed. The dissection process was fairly straightforward because the cystic wall was relatively firm compared with other odontogenic cysts, and an oval-shaped mass was removed.(Fig. 2) The specimen was sent to the department of oral pathology. It was found to consist of ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, the origin of which was considered to be respiratory epithelium.(Fig. 3. A) The healing process in this case was very good and without complications such as infection and wound dehiscence.

Bottom Line: The exact etiology has not been fully identified, but it is thought to arise from misplaced primitive foregut.This lesion develops asymptomatically but sometimes causes difficulty in swallowing and pronunciation depending on its size.Surgeons associated with head and neck pathology should include the oral foregut cyst in the differential diagnosis for ranula, dermoid cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst and lymphangioma in cases of pediatric head and neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
An oral foregut cyst is a rare congenital choristoma lined by the respiratory and/or gastrointestinal epithelium. The exact etiology has not been fully identified, but it is thought to arise from misplaced primitive foregut. This lesion develops asymptomatically but sometimes causes difficulty in swallowing and pronunciation depending on its size. Thus, the first choice of treatment is surgical excision. Surgeons associated with head and neck pathology should include the oral foregut cyst in the differential diagnosis for ranula, dermoid cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst and lymphangioma in cases of pediatric head and neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus