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Variability in the branching pattern of the internal iliac artery in Indian population and its clinical importance.

Sakthivelavan S, Aristotle S, Sivanandan A, Sendiladibban S, Felicia Jebakani C - Anat Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: The larger branches, namely, the inferior gluteal artery, the superior gluteal artery, and the internal pudendal artery, show sufficient regularity in their patterns of origin to allow typing.In significant number of specimens, IIA terminated without dividing into 2 trunks as against the usual description.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Madha Medical College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600122, India.

ABSTRACT
Internal iliac artery (IIA) is one of the terminal branches of the common iliac artery and is the prime artery of pelvis. The artery has many parietal and visceral branches and hence the variations are frequently noted. The larger branches, namely, the inferior gluteal artery, the superior gluteal artery, and the internal pudendal artery, show sufficient regularity in their patterns of origin to allow typing. The variability of the IIA and its branching pattern were studied by dissecting sixty-eight male pelvic halves (34 right and 34 left) and forty-eight female pelvic halves (24 right and 24 left sides). In significant number of specimens, IIA terminated without dividing into 2 trunks as against the usual description. There was also considerable interchange of branches between the 2 terminal divisions. The patterns of branching noted were grouped as per Adachi's classification. The incidence was noted to be as follows: type Ia in 60.6%, type Ib in 2.6%, type IIa in 15.8%, and type III in 21%. The other types were not observed in this study. Conclusion. Interventions in the pelvic region must take into account the variability of the IIA and its branches that can modify the expected relations and may lead to undesired hemorrhagic or embolic accidents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Right half of pelvis showing the bifurcation of IIA at the level of lumbosacral articulation. Arrow: lumbosacral joint; IIA: internal iliac artery; EIA: external iliac artery; IG: inferior gluteal artery; SG: superior gluteal artery; IP: internal pudendal artery; SV: superior vesical artery; IV: inferior vesical artery; MR: middle rectal artery; Ob: obturator artery; LS: lateral sacral artery; IL: Iliolumbar artery.
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fig5: Right half of pelvis showing the bifurcation of IIA at the level of lumbosacral articulation. Arrow: lumbosacral joint; IIA: internal iliac artery; EIA: external iliac artery; IG: inferior gluteal artery; SG: superior gluteal artery; IP: internal pudendal artery; SV: superior vesical artery; IV: inferior vesical artery; MR: middle rectal artery; Ob: obturator artery; LS: lateral sacral artery; IL: Iliolumbar artery.

Mentions: The origin of IIA was found to be at the level of lumbosacral articulation (Figure 5) in 94 specimens (81%) and it was above that level (Figure 6) in 22 specimens (19%). The termination of IIA into its divisions or branches was found to be at the level of upper border of greater sciatic notch in 76 specimens (65.5%) while it was at a highly variable position between lumbosacral articulation and greater sciatic notch in 40 specimens (34.5%).


Variability in the branching pattern of the internal iliac artery in Indian population and its clinical importance.

Sakthivelavan S, Aristotle S, Sivanandan A, Sendiladibban S, Felicia Jebakani C - Anat Res Int (2014)

Right half of pelvis showing the bifurcation of IIA at the level of lumbosacral articulation. Arrow: lumbosacral joint; IIA: internal iliac artery; EIA: external iliac artery; IG: inferior gluteal artery; SG: superior gluteal artery; IP: internal pudendal artery; SV: superior vesical artery; IV: inferior vesical artery; MR: middle rectal artery; Ob: obturator artery; LS: lateral sacral artery; IL: Iliolumbar artery.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279881&req=5

fig5: Right half of pelvis showing the bifurcation of IIA at the level of lumbosacral articulation. Arrow: lumbosacral joint; IIA: internal iliac artery; EIA: external iliac artery; IG: inferior gluteal artery; SG: superior gluteal artery; IP: internal pudendal artery; SV: superior vesical artery; IV: inferior vesical artery; MR: middle rectal artery; Ob: obturator artery; LS: lateral sacral artery; IL: Iliolumbar artery.
Mentions: The origin of IIA was found to be at the level of lumbosacral articulation (Figure 5) in 94 specimens (81%) and it was above that level (Figure 6) in 22 specimens (19%). The termination of IIA into its divisions or branches was found to be at the level of upper border of greater sciatic notch in 76 specimens (65.5%) while it was at a highly variable position between lumbosacral articulation and greater sciatic notch in 40 specimens (34.5%).

Bottom Line: The larger branches, namely, the inferior gluteal artery, the superior gluteal artery, and the internal pudendal artery, show sufficient regularity in their patterns of origin to allow typing.In significant number of specimens, IIA terminated without dividing into 2 trunks as against the usual description.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Madha Medical College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600122, India.

ABSTRACT
Internal iliac artery (IIA) is one of the terminal branches of the common iliac artery and is the prime artery of pelvis. The artery has many parietal and visceral branches and hence the variations are frequently noted. The larger branches, namely, the inferior gluteal artery, the superior gluteal artery, and the internal pudendal artery, show sufficient regularity in their patterns of origin to allow typing. The variability of the IIA and its branching pattern were studied by dissecting sixty-eight male pelvic halves (34 right and 34 left) and forty-eight female pelvic halves (24 right and 24 left sides). In significant number of specimens, IIA terminated without dividing into 2 trunks as against the usual description. There was also considerable interchange of branches between the 2 terminal divisions. The patterns of branching noted were grouped as per Adachi's classification. The incidence was noted to be as follows: type Ia in 60.6%, type Ib in 2.6%, type IIa in 15.8%, and type III in 21%. The other types were not observed in this study. Conclusion. Interventions in the pelvic region must take into account the variability of the IIA and its branches that can modify the expected relations and may lead to undesired hemorrhagic or embolic accidents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus