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First report of Theileria and Anaplasma in the Mongolian gazelle, Procapra gutturosa.

Li Y, Chen Z, Liu Z, Liu J, Yang J, Li Q, Li Y, Ren Q, Niu Q, Guan G, Luo J, Yin H - Parasit Vectors (2014)

Bottom Line: Theileria luwenshuni, A. bovis, A. phagocytophilum, and A. ovis were frequently found in P. gutturosa in China, at a prevalence of 97.8%, 78.3%, 65.2%, and 52.2%, respectively.No other Theileria or Anaplasma species was found in these samples.Our results extend our understanding of the epidemiology of theileriosis and anaplasmosis in P. gutturosa, and will facilitate the implementation of measures to control these tick-borne diseases in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Xujiaping 1, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730046, PR China. youquan-li@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Theileria and Anaplasma are especially important emerging tick-borne pathogens of animals and humans. Molecular surveys and identification of the infectious agents in Mongolian gazelle, Procapra gutturosa are not only crucial for the species' preservation, but also provide valuable information on parasite and bacterial epidemiology.

Findings: A molecular surveillance study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of Theileria spp. and Anaplasma spp. in P. gutturosa by PCR in China. Theileria luwenshuni, A. bovis, A. phagocytophilum, and A. ovis were frequently found in P. gutturosa in China, at a prevalence of 97.8%, 78.3%, 65.2%, and 52.2%, respectively. The prevalence of each pathogens in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis was 80.0%, 66.7%, 76.7%, and 0%, respectively, and in the tick Dermacentor niveus was 88.2%, 35.3%, 88.2%, and 58.5%, respectively. No other Theileria or Anaplasma species was found in these samples. Rickettsia raoultii was detected for the first time in P. gutturosa in China.

Conclusions: Our results extend our understanding of the epidemiology of theileriosis and anaplasmosis in P. gutturosa, and will facilitate the implementation of measures to control these tick-borne diseases in China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree ofTheileriaandBabesiabased on 16S rDNA sequences.
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Fig3: Phylogenetic tree ofTheileriaandBabesiabased on 16S rDNA sequences.

Mentions: The MegAlign component of the Lasergene® program version 4.01 (DNASTAR) was used to generate multiple sequence alignments with the ClustalW algorithm (www.clustal.org/) and for the phylogenetic analyses using the neighbor-joining method. A phylogenetic tree was constructed (Figure 2) based on the Theileria and Babesia 18S rDNA gene sequences determined in this study, and others obtained from the GenBank database under accession numbers: KM186951–KM186957, AY262118, JX469515, JF719832, AY661512, JF719834, EU274472, EU277003, AY260172, FJ603460, AY726011, KJ188212, EU083800, FJ426369, AY262120, KJ188228, Z15105, AY081192, AY260179, AY260176, GQ304524, AY260178, and HQ264112. Another phylogenetic tree was constructed (Figure 3) based on sequences of the Anaplasma and Ehrlichia 16S RNA genes under the following accession numbers: KM186935–KM186937, KM186940, KM186944, KM186947-KM186950, KM246795, KM246796, KM227012, HQ913644, HM131218, JX092094, JN558819, AY077619, EU439943, KM246802, AB196721, AY837736, KC484563, KJ639880, JQ917879, AF414869, NR_074356, KC479022, KC479024, and KJ659037.Figure 2


First report of Theileria and Anaplasma in the Mongolian gazelle, Procapra gutturosa.

Li Y, Chen Z, Liu Z, Liu J, Yang J, Li Q, Li Y, Ren Q, Niu Q, Guan G, Luo J, Yin H - Parasit Vectors (2014)

Phylogenetic tree ofTheileriaandBabesiabased on 16S rDNA sequences.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279875&req=5

Fig3: Phylogenetic tree ofTheileriaandBabesiabased on 16S rDNA sequences.
Mentions: The MegAlign component of the Lasergene® program version 4.01 (DNASTAR) was used to generate multiple sequence alignments with the ClustalW algorithm (www.clustal.org/) and for the phylogenetic analyses using the neighbor-joining method. A phylogenetic tree was constructed (Figure 2) based on the Theileria and Babesia 18S rDNA gene sequences determined in this study, and others obtained from the GenBank database under accession numbers: KM186951–KM186957, AY262118, JX469515, JF719832, AY661512, JF719834, EU274472, EU277003, AY260172, FJ603460, AY726011, KJ188212, EU083800, FJ426369, AY262120, KJ188228, Z15105, AY081192, AY260179, AY260176, GQ304524, AY260178, and HQ264112. Another phylogenetic tree was constructed (Figure 3) based on sequences of the Anaplasma and Ehrlichia 16S RNA genes under the following accession numbers: KM186935–KM186937, KM186940, KM186944, KM186947-KM186950, KM246795, KM246796, KM227012, HQ913644, HM131218, JX092094, JN558819, AY077619, EU439943, KM246802, AB196721, AY837736, KC484563, KJ639880, JQ917879, AF414869, NR_074356, KC479022, KC479024, and KJ659037.Figure 2

Bottom Line: Theileria luwenshuni, A. bovis, A. phagocytophilum, and A. ovis were frequently found in P. gutturosa in China, at a prevalence of 97.8%, 78.3%, 65.2%, and 52.2%, respectively.No other Theileria or Anaplasma species was found in these samples.Our results extend our understanding of the epidemiology of theileriosis and anaplasmosis in P. gutturosa, and will facilitate the implementation of measures to control these tick-borne diseases in China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Xujiaping 1, Lanzhou, Gansu, 730046, PR China. youquan-li@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Theileria and Anaplasma are especially important emerging tick-borne pathogens of animals and humans. Molecular surveys and identification of the infectious agents in Mongolian gazelle, Procapra gutturosa are not only crucial for the species' preservation, but also provide valuable information on parasite and bacterial epidemiology.

Findings: A molecular surveillance study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of Theileria spp. and Anaplasma spp. in P. gutturosa by PCR in China. Theileria luwenshuni, A. bovis, A. phagocytophilum, and A. ovis were frequently found in P. gutturosa in China, at a prevalence of 97.8%, 78.3%, 65.2%, and 52.2%, respectively. The prevalence of each pathogens in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis was 80.0%, 66.7%, 76.7%, and 0%, respectively, and in the tick Dermacentor niveus was 88.2%, 35.3%, 88.2%, and 58.5%, respectively. No other Theileria or Anaplasma species was found in these samples. Rickettsia raoultii was detected for the first time in P. gutturosa in China.

Conclusions: Our results extend our understanding of the epidemiology of theileriosis and anaplasmosis in P. gutturosa, and will facilitate the implementation of measures to control these tick-borne diseases in China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus