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Epidermoid causing ischemic stroke in the brainstem.

Ramdasi R, Mahore A, Kulkarni A, Rangarajan V, Patil M, Kawale J - Case Rep Neurol Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke.We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient.We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College, Parel, Mumbai 400012, India.

ABSTRACT
Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Axial image of plain computed tomography (CT) showing hypodense lesion in right cerebellopontine angle and prepontine cistern with compression of the brainstem. Axial T2 (b) and T1 (c) weighted MR images showing the lesion to be hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 sequence (black arrows outline the tumour). (d) and (e) are T1 weighted axial and sagittal images. (f), (g), and (h) are axial T2, FLAIR, and diffusion weighted images, respectively, revealing another lesion of hyperintensity and restricted diffusion in right half of midbrain.
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fig1: (a) Axial image of plain computed tomography (CT) showing hypodense lesion in right cerebellopontine angle and prepontine cistern with compression of the brainstem. Axial T2 (b) and T1 (c) weighted MR images showing the lesion to be hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 sequence (black arrows outline the tumour). (d) and (e) are T1 weighted axial and sagittal images. (f), (g), and (h) are axial T2, FLAIR, and diffusion weighted images, respectively, revealing another lesion of hyperintensity and restricted diffusion in right half of midbrain.

Mentions: A 12-year-old boy was brought by parents into a rural hospital with complaint of headache for the last 6 months. Computed tomography (CT) scan of brain revealed a hypodense lesion in right cerebellopontine angle and basal cistern (Figure 1(a)). The provisional diagnoses were arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The patient was referred to tertiary care centre for further management as neurosurgical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilities were not available at the rural hospital. However, the parents did not follow the medical advice. He was brought to our emergency department after 5 months when he developed altered sensorium and left hemiparesis of sudden onset. On examination, the patient was drowsy and not obeying commands. The patient had good spontaneous activity of right sided limbs without any spontaneous movements of left sided limbs. There was definite paucity of movements of left sided limbs to the central painful stimuli as compared to those of the right sided limbs. The exact assessment of weakness was not possible due to the drowsy state. The right pupil was larger as compared to the left pupil and was not reacting to light. The left sided limbs had hyperreflexia. The left plantar reflex showed extensor response. The rest of the findings were unremarkable.


Epidermoid causing ischemic stroke in the brainstem.

Ramdasi R, Mahore A, Kulkarni A, Rangarajan V, Patil M, Kawale J - Case Rep Neurol Med (2014)

(a) Axial image of plain computed tomography (CT) showing hypodense lesion in right cerebellopontine angle and prepontine cistern with compression of the brainstem. Axial T2 (b) and T1 (c) weighted MR images showing the lesion to be hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 sequence (black arrows outline the tumour). (d) and (e) are T1 weighted axial and sagittal images. (f), (g), and (h) are axial T2, FLAIR, and diffusion weighted images, respectively, revealing another lesion of hyperintensity and restricted diffusion in right half of midbrain.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279849&req=5

fig1: (a) Axial image of plain computed tomography (CT) showing hypodense lesion in right cerebellopontine angle and prepontine cistern with compression of the brainstem. Axial T2 (b) and T1 (c) weighted MR images showing the lesion to be hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 sequence (black arrows outline the tumour). (d) and (e) are T1 weighted axial and sagittal images. (f), (g), and (h) are axial T2, FLAIR, and diffusion weighted images, respectively, revealing another lesion of hyperintensity and restricted diffusion in right half of midbrain.
Mentions: A 12-year-old boy was brought by parents into a rural hospital with complaint of headache for the last 6 months. Computed tomography (CT) scan of brain revealed a hypodense lesion in right cerebellopontine angle and basal cistern (Figure 1(a)). The provisional diagnoses were arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The patient was referred to tertiary care centre for further management as neurosurgical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilities were not available at the rural hospital. However, the parents did not follow the medical advice. He was brought to our emergency department after 5 months when he developed altered sensorium and left hemiparesis of sudden onset. On examination, the patient was drowsy and not obeying commands. The patient had good spontaneous activity of right sided limbs without any spontaneous movements of left sided limbs. There was definite paucity of movements of left sided limbs to the central painful stimuli as compared to those of the right sided limbs. The exact assessment of weakness was not possible due to the drowsy state. The right pupil was larger as compared to the left pupil and was not reacting to light. The left sided limbs had hyperreflexia. The left plantar reflex showed extensor response. The rest of the findings were unremarkable.

Bottom Line: Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke.We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient.We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College, Parel, Mumbai 400012, India.

ABSTRACT
Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus