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Outpatient Drainage Therapy with a Thoracic Vent for Traumatic Pneumothorax due to Bull Attack.

Sano A, Tsuchiya T, Nagano M - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Outpatient drainage therapy with a thoracic vent was initiated.The air leak stopped on the third day and the thoracic vent was removed on the sixth day.Thoracic vents can be a useful modality for treating traumatic pneumothorax without hemothorax.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Surgery, Chigasaki Municipal Hospital.

ABSTRACT
Outpatient drainage therapy is generally indicated for spontaneous pneumothoraces. A 63-year-old man, who had been attacked by a bull sustaining injuries on the right side of his chest, was referred to the emergency room with dyspnea. His chest X-ray showed a small pneumothorax. The next day, a chest X-ray demonstrated that his pneumothorax had worsened, although no hemothorax was identified. Outpatient drainage therapy with a thoracic vent was initiated. The air leak stopped on the third day and the thoracic vent was removed on the sixth day. Thoracic vents can be a useful modality for treating traumatic pneumothorax without hemothorax.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chest X-ray. (A) A small right-sided pneumothorax was found on day one in the hospital, (B) the right-sided pneumothorax worsened on day two in the hospital, and (C) the right lung was fully expanded on day three in the hospital. The shadow of the Thoracic Vent is shown.
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f2-kjtcvs-47-563: Chest X-ray. (A) A small right-sided pneumothorax was found on day one in the hospital, (B) the right-sided pneumothorax worsened on day two in the hospital, and (C) the right lung was fully expanded on day three in the hospital. The shadow of the Thoracic Vent is shown.

Mentions: A 63-year-old rancher, who had been attacked by a bull an hour before arriving at the hospital, was referred to our emergency room after sustaining injuries on the right side of his chest causing dyspnea and chest pain. His chest X-ray showed right third and fourth rib fractures and a small right-sided pneumothorax (Fig. 2A). His dyspnea slightly worsened the next day and his pneumothorax was found to have progressed, although no hemothorax was found (Fig. 2B). The presence of pneumothorax without hemothorax was identified as an indication for chest drainage. Because there were no symptoms of hemothorax, we chose outpatient drainage therapy with a TV. A TV was inserted through the second intercostal space of his anterior chest wall. His right lung was fully expanded and the air leak stopped on the third day (Fig. 2C). We removed the TV on the sixth day. Only 14 mL of bloody effusion drained into the TV. The pneumothorax did not recur after the TV was removed, and no evidence of hemothorax was found.


Outpatient Drainage Therapy with a Thoracic Vent for Traumatic Pneumothorax due to Bull Attack.

Sano A, Tsuchiya T, Nagano M - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2014)

Chest X-ray. (A) A small right-sided pneumothorax was found on day one in the hospital, (B) the right-sided pneumothorax worsened on day two in the hospital, and (C) the right lung was fully expanded on day three in the hospital. The shadow of the Thoracic Vent is shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279843&req=5

f2-kjtcvs-47-563: Chest X-ray. (A) A small right-sided pneumothorax was found on day one in the hospital, (B) the right-sided pneumothorax worsened on day two in the hospital, and (C) the right lung was fully expanded on day three in the hospital. The shadow of the Thoracic Vent is shown.
Mentions: A 63-year-old rancher, who had been attacked by a bull an hour before arriving at the hospital, was referred to our emergency room after sustaining injuries on the right side of his chest causing dyspnea and chest pain. His chest X-ray showed right third and fourth rib fractures and a small right-sided pneumothorax (Fig. 2A). His dyspnea slightly worsened the next day and his pneumothorax was found to have progressed, although no hemothorax was found (Fig. 2B). The presence of pneumothorax without hemothorax was identified as an indication for chest drainage. Because there were no symptoms of hemothorax, we chose outpatient drainage therapy with a TV. A TV was inserted through the second intercostal space of his anterior chest wall. His right lung was fully expanded and the air leak stopped on the third day (Fig. 2C). We removed the TV on the sixth day. Only 14 mL of bloody effusion drained into the TV. The pneumothorax did not recur after the TV was removed, and no evidence of hemothorax was found.

Bottom Line: Outpatient drainage therapy with a thoracic vent was initiated.The air leak stopped on the third day and the thoracic vent was removed on the sixth day.Thoracic vents can be a useful modality for treating traumatic pneumothorax without hemothorax.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Surgery, Chigasaki Municipal Hospital.

ABSTRACT
Outpatient drainage therapy is generally indicated for spontaneous pneumothoraces. A 63-year-old man, who had been attacked by a bull sustaining injuries on the right side of his chest, was referred to the emergency room with dyspnea. His chest X-ray showed a small pneumothorax. The next day, a chest X-ray demonstrated that his pneumothorax had worsened, although no hemothorax was identified. Outpatient drainage therapy with a thoracic vent was initiated. The air leak stopped on the third day and the thoracic vent was removed on the sixth day. Thoracic vents can be a useful modality for treating traumatic pneumothorax without hemothorax.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus