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Pseudoaneurysm of surgically reconstructed right ventricular outflow tract complicated by superior vena cava syndrome.

Lee Y, Lee JT, Cho JY, Kim GJ - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Pseudoaneurysm of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) has been reported as a rare complication of RVOT reconstruction performed using conduit replacement or patch repair.Rarely, it may present alongside symptoms secondary to the compression of adjoining mediastinal structures.In the present case, superior vena cava syndrome was caused by compression of the superior vena cava, which was a very unusual presentation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysm of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) has been reported as a rare complication of RVOT reconstruction performed using conduit replacement or patch repair. Rarely, it may present alongside symptoms secondary to the compression of adjoining mediastinal structures. We report the case of a patient who developed a symptomatic RVOT pseudoaneurysm one month after a total correction of tetralogy of Fallot. In the present case, superior vena cava syndrome was caused by compression of the superior vena cava, which was a very unusual presentation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An abnormal coronary artery is shown crossing the right ventricular outflow tract.
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f1-kjtcvs-47-541: An abnormal coronary artery is shown crossing the right ventricular outflow tract.

Mentions: On intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, the pulmonary valve residual pressure gradient was 49 mmHg and systolic pressure ratio between the right and left ventricles was 0.8 mmHG. However, we could not place a trans-annular patch because the patient had an anomalous coronary artery crossing the RVOT. The left anterior descending artery originated from the right coronary artery crossing the RVOT (Fig. 1). Therefore, we did not continue the procedure and treated the patient with a beta-blocker. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged on postoperative day six.


Pseudoaneurysm of surgically reconstructed right ventricular outflow tract complicated by superior vena cava syndrome.

Lee Y, Lee JT, Cho JY, Kim GJ - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2014)

An abnormal coronary artery is shown crossing the right ventricular outflow tract.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279834&req=5

f1-kjtcvs-47-541: An abnormal coronary artery is shown crossing the right ventricular outflow tract.
Mentions: On intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, the pulmonary valve residual pressure gradient was 49 mmHg and systolic pressure ratio between the right and left ventricles was 0.8 mmHG. However, we could not place a trans-annular patch because the patient had an anomalous coronary artery crossing the RVOT. The left anterior descending artery originated from the right coronary artery crossing the RVOT (Fig. 1). Therefore, we did not continue the procedure and treated the patient with a beta-blocker. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged on postoperative day six.

Bottom Line: Pseudoaneurysm of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) has been reported as a rare complication of RVOT reconstruction performed using conduit replacement or patch repair.Rarely, it may present alongside symptoms secondary to the compression of adjoining mediastinal structures.In the present case, superior vena cava syndrome was caused by compression of the superior vena cava, which was a very unusual presentation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine.

ABSTRACT
Pseudoaneurysm of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) has been reported as a rare complication of RVOT reconstruction performed using conduit replacement or patch repair. Rarely, it may present alongside symptoms secondary to the compression of adjoining mediastinal structures. We report the case of a patient who developed a symptomatic RVOT pseudoaneurysm one month after a total correction of tetralogy of Fallot. In the present case, superior vena cava syndrome was caused by compression of the superior vena cava, which was a very unusual presentation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus