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Systemic inflammation response syndrome score predicts the mortality in multiple trauma patients.

Baek JH, Kim MS, Lee JC, Lee JH - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: Numerous statistical models have been developed to accurately predict outcomes in multiple trauma patients.Then, the outcomes between the two groups were compared.There were no significant differences in the general characteristics of patients, but the trauma severity scores were significantly different between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine.

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous statistical models have been developed to accurately predict outcomes in multiple trauma patients. However, such trauma scoring systems reflect the patient's physiological condition, which can only be determined to a limited extent, and are difficult to use when performing a rapid initial assessment. We studied the predictive ability of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score compared to other scoring systems.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 229 patients with multiple trauma combined with chest injury from January 2006 to June 2011. A SIRS score was calculated for patients based on their presentation to the emergency room. The patients were divided into two groups: those with an SIRS score of two points or above and those with an SIRS score of one or zero. Then, the outcomes between the two groups were compared. Furthermore, the ability of the SIRS score and other injury severity scoring systems to predict mortality was compared.

Results: Hospital death occurred in 12 patients (5.2%). There were no significant differences in the general characteristics of patients, but the trauma severity scores were significantly different between the two groups. The SIRS scores, number of complications, and mortality rate were significantly higher in those with a SIRS score of two or above (p<0.001). In the multivariant analysis, the SIRS score was the only independent factor related to mortality.

Conclusion: The SIRS score is easily calculated on admission and may accurately predict mortality in patients with multiple traumas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome score and mortality. The area under the curve (AUC) is 0.884 with discrimination between 1.5 (sensitivity=0.833, specificity=0.742) and 2.5 (sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.94).
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f1-kjtcvs-47-523: Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome score and mortality. The area under the curve (AUC) is 0.884 with discrimination between 1.5 (sensitivity=0.833, specificity=0.742) and 2.5 (sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.94).

Mentions: We retrospectively reviewed data on 229 patients who were hospitalized with multiple trauma combined with chest injury from January 2006 to June 2011. A SIRS score was calculated based on their presentation upon admission. One point was given for each of the following: temperature >38°C or <36°C, heart rate >90 beats per minute, respiratory rate > 20 breaths per minute, neutrophil count >12,000 cells/mcl or <4,000 cells/mcl. We used the receiver-operating characteristic analysis to determine an adequate cut-off value for the SIRS score that had a good ability to predict mortality. The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.884, and the best-discriminating SIRS score was between 1.5 (sensitivity=0.833, specificity=0.742) and 2.5 (sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.94) (Fig. 1). Thus, we divided the patients into two groups based on this analysis: those with a SIRS score of two points or above (the S2OA group) and those with a score one or zero (the S1OZ group). We also calculated results for each patient using other scoring systems including the ISS, NISS, RTS, and TRISS. Patients with severe neurologic injuries were excluded. We compared the complications and mortality rates between the two groups and the ability of the SIRS score compared to other injury severity scores to predict mortality in trauma patients. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 10.2 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Differences were considered to be statistically significant if p<0.05.


Systemic inflammation response syndrome score predicts the mortality in multiple trauma patients.

Baek JH, Kim MS, Lee JC, Lee JH - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2014)

Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome score and mortality. The area under the curve (AUC) is 0.884 with discrimination between 1.5 (sensitivity=0.833, specificity=0.742) and 2.5 (sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.94).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279832&req=5

f1-kjtcvs-47-523: Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome score and mortality. The area under the curve (AUC) is 0.884 with discrimination between 1.5 (sensitivity=0.833, specificity=0.742) and 2.5 (sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.94).
Mentions: We retrospectively reviewed data on 229 patients who were hospitalized with multiple trauma combined with chest injury from January 2006 to June 2011. A SIRS score was calculated based on their presentation upon admission. One point was given for each of the following: temperature >38°C or <36°C, heart rate >90 beats per minute, respiratory rate > 20 breaths per minute, neutrophil count >12,000 cells/mcl or <4,000 cells/mcl. We used the receiver-operating characteristic analysis to determine an adequate cut-off value for the SIRS score that had a good ability to predict mortality. The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.884, and the best-discriminating SIRS score was between 1.5 (sensitivity=0.833, specificity=0.742) and 2.5 (sensitivity=0.667, specificity=0.94) (Fig. 1). Thus, we divided the patients into two groups based on this analysis: those with a SIRS score of two points or above (the S2OA group) and those with a score one or zero (the S1OZ group). We also calculated results for each patient using other scoring systems including the ISS, NISS, RTS, and TRISS. Patients with severe neurologic injuries were excluded. We compared the complications and mortality rates between the two groups and the ability of the SIRS score compared to other injury severity scores to predict mortality in trauma patients. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 10.2 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Differences were considered to be statistically significant if p<0.05.

Bottom Line: Numerous statistical models have been developed to accurately predict outcomes in multiple trauma patients.Then, the outcomes between the two groups were compared.There were no significant differences in the general characteristics of patients, but the trauma severity scores were significantly different between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Yeungnam University College of Medicine.

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous statistical models have been developed to accurately predict outcomes in multiple trauma patients. However, such trauma scoring systems reflect the patient's physiological condition, which can only be determined to a limited extent, and are difficult to use when performing a rapid initial assessment. We studied the predictive ability of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score compared to other scoring systems.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 229 patients with multiple trauma combined with chest injury from January 2006 to June 2011. A SIRS score was calculated for patients based on their presentation to the emergency room. The patients were divided into two groups: those with an SIRS score of two points or above and those with an SIRS score of one or zero. Then, the outcomes between the two groups were compared. Furthermore, the ability of the SIRS score and other injury severity scoring systems to predict mortality was compared.

Results: Hospital death occurred in 12 patients (5.2%). There were no significant differences in the general characteristics of patients, but the trauma severity scores were significantly different between the two groups. The SIRS scores, number of complications, and mortality rate were significantly higher in those with a SIRS score of two or above (p<0.001). In the multivariant analysis, the SIRS score was the only independent factor related to mortality.

Conclusion: The SIRS score is easily calculated on admission and may accurately predict mortality in patients with multiple traumas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus