Limits...
Work-relatedness of lung cancer by smoking and histologic type in Korea.

Lee YI, Lee SG, Kang DM, Kim JE, Kim YK, Leem JH, Kim HC - Ann Occup Environ Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Work-relatedness was categorized as "definite," "probable," "possible," "suspicious," "none," or "undetermined." Among the subjects, 69.3% were men and 30.7% were women.Among current smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common among definite and probable cases (13.4%), while non-small cell lung cancer was the least common (7.1%).Among non-smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (21.4%), while the least common was adenocarcinoma (1.6%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, 626-770 South Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study investigated the distribution of causative agents related to occupational lung cancer, their relationships with work, and associations between work-relatedness and the histologic type of lung cancer.

Methods: We used data from the occupational surveillance system in Korea in 2013. In addition, data from 1,404 participants diagnosed with lung cancer were collected through interviews. We included the patients' longest-held job in the analysis. Work-relatedness was categorized as "definite," "probable," "possible," "suspicious," "none," or "undetermined."

Results: Among the subjects, 69.3% were men and 30.7% were women. Regarding smoking status, current smokers were the most prevalent (35.5%), followed by non-smokers (32.3%), ex-smokers (32.2%). Regarding the causative agents of lung cancer, asbestos (1.0%) and crystalline silica (0.9%) were the most common in definite work-related cases, while non-arsenical insecticide (2.8%) was the most common in probable cases followed by diesel engine exhaust (1.9%) and asbestos (1.0%). Regarding histologic type, adenocarcinoma was the most common (41.7%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (21.2%). Among current smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common among definite and probable cases (13.4%), while non-small cell lung cancer was the least common (7.1%). Among non-smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (21.4%), while the least common was adenocarcinoma (1.6%).

Conclusions: Approximately, 9.5% of all lung cancer cases in Korea are occupational-related lung cancer. Well-known substances associated with lung cancer, such as crystalline silica, asbestos, and diesel engine exhaust, are of particular concern. However, the histologic types of lung cancer related to smoking were inconsistent with previous studies when work-relatedness was taken into account. Future studies are required to clarify the incidence of occupational lung cancer in agricultural workers exposed to non-arsenical insecticides and the associations between work-relatedness and the histologic type of lung cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participating hospitals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279786&req=5

Fig1: Participating hospitals.

Mentions: The data sources were divided into middle and southern regions of Korea, and trained investigators conducted interviews with lung cancer patients selected from each region. We stratified into 16 administrative regions consisting of metropolitan city and province across the country, and each metropolitan city and province was defined as one independent unit; in each area, we selected regional hub hospitals that are established cancer centers because each cancer patients would be likely to be concentrated around regional hub hospitals. For the large hospitals of capital area, we selected multiple hospitals because these are representative not only in capital area but also in nationwide region. Finally, 8 and 10 hospitals in the middle and southern areas were selected. This study was approved by the respective institutional review board of each hospital, and all patients provided informed consent prior to enrollment (FigureĀ 1).Figure 1


Work-relatedness of lung cancer by smoking and histologic type in Korea.

Lee YI, Lee SG, Kang DM, Kim JE, Kim YK, Leem JH, Kim HC - Ann Occup Environ Med (2014)

Participating hospitals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279786&req=5

Fig1: Participating hospitals.
Mentions: The data sources were divided into middle and southern regions of Korea, and trained investigators conducted interviews with lung cancer patients selected from each region. We stratified into 16 administrative regions consisting of metropolitan city and province across the country, and each metropolitan city and province was defined as one independent unit; in each area, we selected regional hub hospitals that are established cancer centers because each cancer patients would be likely to be concentrated around regional hub hospitals. For the large hospitals of capital area, we selected multiple hospitals because these are representative not only in capital area but also in nationwide region. Finally, 8 and 10 hospitals in the middle and southern areas were selected. This study was approved by the respective institutional review board of each hospital, and all patients provided informed consent prior to enrollment (FigureĀ 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Work-relatedness was categorized as "definite," "probable," "possible," "suspicious," "none," or "undetermined." Among the subjects, 69.3% were men and 30.7% were women.Among current smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common among definite and probable cases (13.4%), while non-small cell lung cancer was the least common (7.1%).Among non-smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (21.4%), while the least common was adenocarcinoma (1.6%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, 626-770 South Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study investigated the distribution of causative agents related to occupational lung cancer, their relationships with work, and associations between work-relatedness and the histologic type of lung cancer.

Methods: We used data from the occupational surveillance system in Korea in 2013. In addition, data from 1,404 participants diagnosed with lung cancer were collected through interviews. We included the patients' longest-held job in the analysis. Work-relatedness was categorized as "definite," "probable," "possible," "suspicious," "none," or "undetermined."

Results: Among the subjects, 69.3% were men and 30.7% were women. Regarding smoking status, current smokers were the most prevalent (35.5%), followed by non-smokers (32.3%), ex-smokers (32.2%). Regarding the causative agents of lung cancer, asbestos (1.0%) and crystalline silica (0.9%) were the most common in definite work-related cases, while non-arsenical insecticide (2.8%) was the most common in probable cases followed by diesel engine exhaust (1.9%) and asbestos (1.0%). Regarding histologic type, adenocarcinoma was the most common (41.7%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (21.2%). Among current smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common among definite and probable cases (13.4%), while non-small cell lung cancer was the least common (7.1%). Among non-smokers, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (21.4%), while the least common was adenocarcinoma (1.6%).

Conclusions: Approximately, 9.5% of all lung cancer cases in Korea are occupational-related lung cancer. Well-known substances associated with lung cancer, such as crystalline silica, asbestos, and diesel engine exhaust, are of particular concern. However, the histologic types of lung cancer related to smoking were inconsistent with previous studies when work-relatedness was taken into account. Future studies are required to clarify the incidence of occupational lung cancer in agricultural workers exposed to non-arsenical insecticides and the associations between work-relatedness and the histologic type of lung cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus