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Tissue distribution and excretion kinetics of orally administered silica nanoparticles in rats.

Lee JA, Kim MK, Paek HJ, Kim YR, Kim MK, Lee JK, Jeong J, Choi SJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Bottom Line: Size-dependent excretion kinetics were apparent and the smaller 20 nm particles were found to be more rapidly eliminated than the larger 100 nm particles.In vivo, silica nanoparticles were found to retain their particulate form, although more decomposition was observed in kidneys, especially for 20 nm particles.These findings will be of interest to those seeking to predict potential toxicological effects of silica nanoparticles on target organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The effects of particle size on the tissue distribution and excretion kinetics of silica nanoparticles and their biological fates were investigated following a single oral administration to male and female rats.

Methods: Silica nanoparticles of two different sizes (20 nm and 100 nm) were orally administered to male and female rats, respectively. Tissue distribution kinetics, excretion profiles, and fates in tissues were analyzed using elemental analysis and transmission electron microscopy.

Results: The differently sized silica nanoparticles mainly distributed to kidneys and liver for 3 days post-administration and, to some extent, to lungs and spleen for 2 days post-administration, regardless of particle size or sex. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy studies in tissues demonstrated almost intact particles in liver, but partially decomposed particles with an irregular morphology were found in kidneys, especially in rats that had been administered 20 nm nanoparticles. Size-dependent excretion kinetics were apparent and the smaller 20 nm particles were found to be more rapidly eliminated than the larger 100 nm particles. Elimination profiles showed 7%-8% of silica nanoparticles were excreted via urine, but most nanoparticles were excreted via feces, regardless of particle size or sex.

Conclusion: The kidneys, liver, lungs, and spleen were found to be the target organs of orally-administered silica nanoparticles in rats, and this organ distribution was not affected by particle size or animal sex. In vivo, silica nanoparticles were found to retain their particulate form, although more decomposition was observed in kidneys, especially for 20 nm particles. Urinary and fecal excretion pathways were determined to play roles in the elimination of silica nanoparticles, but 20 nm particles were secreted more rapidly, presumably because they are more easily decomposed. These findings will be of interest to those seeking to predict potential toxicological effects of silica nanoparticles on target organs.

No MeSH data available.


Body weight gains of male and female rats administered 20 nm or 100 nm silica nanoparticles.Notes: (A) Male rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (B) Female rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (C) Male rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. (D) Female rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. No significant difference was observed versus untreated controls.
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f1-ijn-9-251: Body weight gains of male and female rats administered 20 nm or 100 nm silica nanoparticles.Notes: (A) Male rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (B) Female rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (C) Male rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. (D) Female rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. No significant difference was observed versus untreated controls.

Mentions: Survival rates, body weights, behaviors, and symptoms were carefully observed for 14 days post-administration. Male and female rats that were administered the two differently sized silica nanoparticles up to 1,000 mg/kg showed no body weight loss, abnormal behaviors, or symptoms as compared with untreated controls (Figure 1). No significant difference in body weights was found between treated and control animals.


Tissue distribution and excretion kinetics of orally administered silica nanoparticles in rats.

Lee JA, Kim MK, Paek HJ, Kim YR, Kim MK, Lee JK, Jeong J, Choi SJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2014)

Body weight gains of male and female rats administered 20 nm or 100 nm silica nanoparticles.Notes: (A) Male rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (B) Female rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (C) Male rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. (D) Female rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. No significant difference was observed versus untreated controls.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279759&req=5

f1-ijn-9-251: Body weight gains of male and female rats administered 20 nm or 100 nm silica nanoparticles.Notes: (A) Male rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (B) Female rats administered 20 nm silica nanoparticles. (C) Male rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. (D) Female rats administered 100 nm silica nanoparticles. No significant difference was observed versus untreated controls.
Mentions: Survival rates, body weights, behaviors, and symptoms were carefully observed for 14 days post-administration. Male and female rats that were administered the two differently sized silica nanoparticles up to 1,000 mg/kg showed no body weight loss, abnormal behaviors, or symptoms as compared with untreated controls (Figure 1). No significant difference in body weights was found between treated and control animals.

Bottom Line: Size-dependent excretion kinetics were apparent and the smaller 20 nm particles were found to be more rapidly eliminated than the larger 100 nm particles.In vivo, silica nanoparticles were found to retain their particulate form, although more decomposition was observed in kidneys, especially for 20 nm particles.These findings will be of interest to those seeking to predict potential toxicological effects of silica nanoparticles on target organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The effects of particle size on the tissue distribution and excretion kinetics of silica nanoparticles and their biological fates were investigated following a single oral administration to male and female rats.

Methods: Silica nanoparticles of two different sizes (20 nm and 100 nm) were orally administered to male and female rats, respectively. Tissue distribution kinetics, excretion profiles, and fates in tissues were analyzed using elemental analysis and transmission electron microscopy.

Results: The differently sized silica nanoparticles mainly distributed to kidneys and liver for 3 days post-administration and, to some extent, to lungs and spleen for 2 days post-administration, regardless of particle size or sex. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy studies in tissues demonstrated almost intact particles in liver, but partially decomposed particles with an irregular morphology were found in kidneys, especially in rats that had been administered 20 nm nanoparticles. Size-dependent excretion kinetics were apparent and the smaller 20 nm particles were found to be more rapidly eliminated than the larger 100 nm particles. Elimination profiles showed 7%-8% of silica nanoparticles were excreted via urine, but most nanoparticles were excreted via feces, regardless of particle size or sex.

Conclusion: The kidneys, liver, lungs, and spleen were found to be the target organs of orally-administered silica nanoparticles in rats, and this organ distribution was not affected by particle size or animal sex. In vivo, silica nanoparticles were found to retain their particulate form, although more decomposition was observed in kidneys, especially for 20 nm particles. Urinary and fecal excretion pathways were determined to play roles in the elimination of silica nanoparticles, but 20 nm particles were secreted more rapidly, presumably because they are more easily decomposed. These findings will be of interest to those seeking to predict potential toxicological effects of silica nanoparticles on target organs.

No MeSH data available.