Limits...
Evaluation of suspected aspirated beverage can pull tab: radiographs may not be enough.

Kotsenas AL, Campeau NG, Oeckler RA, Kuzo RS - Case Rep Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Neck and chest radiographs did not reveal an aspirated foreign body.Seven months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest performed as part of an unrelated lung cancer work up confirmed the presence of a left mainstem bronchus metallic foreign body compatible with a pull tab.In such presentations it is imperative to have a low threshold for performing further diagnostic evaluation with CT due to the relatively high radiolucency of aluminum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

ABSTRACT
A 67-year-old male presented to the emergency department with concern for accidental aspiration of an aluminum beverage can pull tab. Neck and chest radiographs did not reveal an aspirated foreign body. Despite ongoing complaint of dysgeusia and adamancy of aspiration by the patient, he was discharged to home without recommendation for further follow-up. Seven months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest performed as part of an unrelated lung cancer work up confirmed the presence of a left mainstem bronchus metallic foreign body compatible with a pull tab. This case report illustrates the poor negative predictive value of radiographs for a suspected aluminum foreign body and demonstrates the superiority of CT for this purpose. In such presentations it is imperative to have a low threshold for performing further diagnostic evaluation with CT due to the relatively high radiolucency of aluminum.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PA chest (a) and lateral neck (b) radiographs obtained day of suspected aluminum tab aspiration fail to demonstrate a metallic foreign body. There is no evidence for supportive findings on chest radiographs such as atelectasis or air-trapping.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279718&req=5

fig1: PA chest (a) and lateral neck (b) radiographs obtained day of suspected aluminum tab aspiration fail to demonstrate a metallic foreign body. There is no evidence for supportive findings on chest radiographs such as atelectasis or air-trapping.

Mentions: A 67-year-old male former smoker sought medical attention following an episode in which he believed he accidentally aspirated an aluminum pull tab from a beverage can. Chest and neck radiographs (Figures 1(a) and 1(b)) did not reveal evidence of an aspirated foreign body, and the patient was told by his physician that he had likely ingested and “passed it.” The patient denied excreting the tab and maintained that he had a persistent metallic taste in his mouth that he believed was due to the presence of the aluminum beverage pull tab. The treating physician believed that a negative chest radiograph was sufficient to exclude the possibility of an aspirated aluminum pull tab, and therefore no further evaluation was performed and the patient was sent home without further follow-up.


Evaluation of suspected aspirated beverage can pull tab: radiographs may not be enough.

Kotsenas AL, Campeau NG, Oeckler RA, Kuzo RS - Case Rep Radiol (2014)

PA chest (a) and lateral neck (b) radiographs obtained day of suspected aluminum tab aspiration fail to demonstrate a metallic foreign body. There is no evidence for supportive findings on chest radiographs such as atelectasis or air-trapping.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4279718&req=5

fig1: PA chest (a) and lateral neck (b) radiographs obtained day of suspected aluminum tab aspiration fail to demonstrate a metallic foreign body. There is no evidence for supportive findings on chest radiographs such as atelectasis or air-trapping.
Mentions: A 67-year-old male former smoker sought medical attention following an episode in which he believed he accidentally aspirated an aluminum pull tab from a beverage can. Chest and neck radiographs (Figures 1(a) and 1(b)) did not reveal evidence of an aspirated foreign body, and the patient was told by his physician that he had likely ingested and “passed it.” The patient denied excreting the tab and maintained that he had a persistent metallic taste in his mouth that he believed was due to the presence of the aluminum beverage pull tab. The treating physician believed that a negative chest radiograph was sufficient to exclude the possibility of an aspirated aluminum pull tab, and therefore no further evaluation was performed and the patient was sent home without further follow-up.

Bottom Line: Neck and chest radiographs did not reveal an aspirated foreign body.Seven months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest performed as part of an unrelated lung cancer work up confirmed the presence of a left mainstem bronchus metallic foreign body compatible with a pull tab.In such presentations it is imperative to have a low threshold for performing further diagnostic evaluation with CT due to the relatively high radiolucency of aluminum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

ABSTRACT
A 67-year-old male presented to the emergency department with concern for accidental aspiration of an aluminum beverage can pull tab. Neck and chest radiographs did not reveal an aspirated foreign body. Despite ongoing complaint of dysgeusia and adamancy of aspiration by the patient, he was discharged to home without recommendation for further follow-up. Seven months later, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest performed as part of an unrelated lung cancer work up confirmed the presence of a left mainstem bronchus metallic foreign body compatible with a pull tab. This case report illustrates the poor negative predictive value of radiographs for a suspected aluminum foreign body and demonstrates the superiority of CT for this purpose. In such presentations it is imperative to have a low threshold for performing further diagnostic evaluation with CT due to the relatively high radiolucency of aluminum.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus