Limits...
Effectiveness of Palivizumab in Preventing RSV Hospitalization in High Risk Children: A Real-World Perspective.

Homaira N, Rawlinson W, Snelling TL, Jaffe A - Int J Pediatr (2014)

Bottom Line: Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been recommended for high risk infants to prevent severe RSV-associated respiratory illness.This review supports the recommended use of palivizumab for reducing RSV-associated hospitalization rates in premature infants born at gestational age < 33 weeks and in children with chronic lung and heart diseases.Data are limited to allow commenting on the protective effect of palivizumab among other high risk children, including those with Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and haematological malignancy, indicating further research is warranted in these groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Disciplines of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW, Sydney Children's Hospital, Level 3, Emergency Wing, Randwick, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes globally of childhood respiratory morbidity and hospitalization. Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been recommended for high risk infants to prevent severe RSV-associated respiratory illness. This recommendation is based on evidence of efficacy when used under clinical trial conditions. However the real-world effectiveness of palivizumab outside of clinical trials among different patient populations is not well established. We performed a systematic review focusing on postlicensure observational studies of the protective effect of palivizumab prophylaxis for reducing RSV-associated hospitalizations in infants and children at high risk of severe infection. We searched studies published in English between 1 January 1999 and August 2013 and identified 420 articles, of which 20 met the inclusion criteria. This review supports the recommended use of palivizumab for reducing RSV-associated hospitalization rates in premature infants born at gestational age < 33 weeks and in children with chronic lung and heart diseases. Data are limited to allow commenting on the protective effect of palivizumab among other high risk children, including those with Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and haematological malignancy, indicating further research is warranted in these groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Characteristics of the selected studies on effectiveness of palivizumab in reducing RSV-associated hospitalization in high risk infants and children.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274815&req=5

fig2: Characteristics of the selected studies on effectiveness of palivizumab in reducing RSV-associated hospitalization in high risk infants and children.

Mentions: The initial search identified 420 articles (Figure 1). After removing studies that did not meet our inclusion criteria, 20 studies were included: 12 were cohort studies, 7 were record reviews, and one was a questionnaire-based survey. The included studies were conducted in the USA, Canada, Australia, Japan, Korea, and Europe (Figure 2).


Effectiveness of Palivizumab in Preventing RSV Hospitalization in High Risk Children: A Real-World Perspective.

Homaira N, Rawlinson W, Snelling TL, Jaffe A - Int J Pediatr (2014)

Characteristics of the selected studies on effectiveness of palivizumab in reducing RSV-associated hospitalization in high risk infants and children.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274815&req=5

fig2: Characteristics of the selected studies on effectiveness of palivizumab in reducing RSV-associated hospitalization in high risk infants and children.
Mentions: The initial search identified 420 articles (Figure 1). After removing studies that did not meet our inclusion criteria, 20 studies were included: 12 were cohort studies, 7 were record reviews, and one was a questionnaire-based survey. The included studies were conducted in the USA, Canada, Australia, Japan, Korea, and Europe (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been recommended for high risk infants to prevent severe RSV-associated respiratory illness.This review supports the recommended use of palivizumab for reducing RSV-associated hospitalization rates in premature infants born at gestational age < 33 weeks and in children with chronic lung and heart diseases.Data are limited to allow commenting on the protective effect of palivizumab among other high risk children, including those with Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and haematological malignancy, indicating further research is warranted in these groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Disciplines of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW, Sydney Children's Hospital, Level 3, Emergency Wing, Randwick, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes globally of childhood respiratory morbidity and hospitalization. Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, has been recommended for high risk infants to prevent severe RSV-associated respiratory illness. This recommendation is based on evidence of efficacy when used under clinical trial conditions. However the real-world effectiveness of palivizumab outside of clinical trials among different patient populations is not well established. We performed a systematic review focusing on postlicensure observational studies of the protective effect of palivizumab prophylaxis for reducing RSV-associated hospitalizations in infants and children at high risk of severe infection. We searched studies published in English between 1 January 1999 and August 2013 and identified 420 articles, of which 20 met the inclusion criteria. This review supports the recommended use of palivizumab for reducing RSV-associated hospitalization rates in premature infants born at gestational age < 33 weeks and in children with chronic lung and heart diseases. Data are limited to allow commenting on the protective effect of palivizumab among other high risk children, including those with Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and haematological malignancy, indicating further research is warranted in these groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus