Limits...
Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fetal MR images demonstrating absent cranial bone/brain and bulging orbits (arrows). In addition, polyhydramnios is seen (star).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f27-poljradiol-79-479: Fetal MR images demonstrating absent cranial bone/brain and bulging orbits (arrows). In addition, polyhydramnios is seen (star).

Mentions: Anencephaly is the most severe form of cranial neural tube defects (NTD) and is characterized by the absence of cortical tissue (although the brainstem and the cerebellum may be present) or cranial vault. Morphological spectrum within anencephaly ranges from holocrania (severest form) to merocrania (mildest form). Anencephaly may be radiologically detectable as early as at 11 weeks. A “frog eye” appearance may be seen in the coronal plane of US or MR images due to an absent cranial bone or brain, and bulging orbits (Figure 27) [31].


Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Fetal MR images demonstrating absent cranial bone/brain and bulging orbits (arrows). In addition, polyhydramnios is seen (star).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f27-poljradiol-79-479: Fetal MR images demonstrating absent cranial bone/brain and bulging orbits (arrows). In addition, polyhydramnios is seen (star).
Mentions: Anencephaly is the most severe form of cranial neural tube defects (NTD) and is characterized by the absence of cortical tissue (although the brainstem and the cerebellum may be present) or cranial vault. Morphological spectrum within anencephaly ranges from holocrania (severest form) to merocrania (mildest form). Anencephaly may be radiologically detectable as early as at 11 weeks. A “frog eye” appearance may be seen in the coronal plane of US or MR images due to an absent cranial bone or brain, and bulging orbits (Figure 27) [31].

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus