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Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lateral skull radiograph in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome showing parallel cortical calcifications (thin-white arrows). Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted MRI showing gyriform contrast enhancement in the right cerebral hemisphere (white arrows). There is brain atrophy on the right side. The cranial vault is asymmetric as secondary to brain atrophy.
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f23-poljradiol-79-479: Lateral skull radiograph in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome showing parallel cortical calcifications (thin-white arrows). Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted MRI showing gyriform contrast enhancement in the right cerebral hemisphere (white arrows). There is brain atrophy on the right side. The cranial vault is asymmetric as secondary to brain atrophy.

Mentions: The tram-track sign is seen on skull radiographs as gyriform, curvilinear, parallel opacities that have the appearance of calcifications (Figure 23). A similar appearance can be seen on CTs. Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome that includes a facial port-wine stain and is associated with leptomeningeal angiomatosis. Weber demonstrated the characteristic gyriform intracranial calcifications. Calcifications are often gyriform and curvilinear and are most common in the parietal and occipital lobes. Calcifications can be more extensive but with frontal lobe and/or bilateral involvement. CT scans show calcifications in the areas of atrophy [27].


Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Lateral skull radiograph in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome showing parallel cortical calcifications (thin-white arrows). Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted MRI showing gyriform contrast enhancement in the right cerebral hemisphere (white arrows). There is brain atrophy on the right side. The cranial vault is asymmetric as secondary to brain atrophy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f23-poljradiol-79-479: Lateral skull radiograph in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome showing parallel cortical calcifications (thin-white arrows). Contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted MRI showing gyriform contrast enhancement in the right cerebral hemisphere (white arrows). There is brain atrophy on the right side. The cranial vault is asymmetric as secondary to brain atrophy.
Mentions: The tram-track sign is seen on skull radiographs as gyriform, curvilinear, parallel opacities that have the appearance of calcifications (Figure 23). A similar appearance can be seen on CTs. Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome that includes a facial port-wine stain and is associated with leptomeningeal angiomatosis. Weber demonstrated the characteristic gyriform intracranial calcifications. Calcifications are often gyriform and curvilinear and are most common in the parietal and occipital lobes. Calcifications can be more extensive but with frontal lobe and/or bilateral involvement. CT scans show calcifications in the areas of atrophy [27].

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus