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Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Transverse US image showing small posterior fossa and banana-shaped cerebellum (“banana sign”) (black arrows.
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f21-poljradiol-79-479: Transverse US image showing small posterior fossa and banana-shaped cerebellum (“banana sign”) (black arrows.

Mentions: The banana cerebellum sign is one of the many notable fruit-inspired signs, such as the “lemon sign”. In neural tube defects, folding of the cerebellum around the posterior brain stem due to inferior traction of the spinal cord causes the cerebellum to take the form of a banana. It has been reported that it may be present in 57% of fetuses with neural tube defect. In fetal hydrocephalus, a cerebellar deformation is observed in conjunction with ventriculomegaly and deletion of cisterna magna. In these cases, the cerebellum loses its normal central convexity and becomes compressed parallelly to the occipital bone, resembling a banana (Figure 21) [24].


Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Transverse US image showing small posterior fossa and banana-shaped cerebellum (“banana sign”) (black arrows.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f21-poljradiol-79-479: Transverse US image showing small posterior fossa and banana-shaped cerebellum (“banana sign”) (black arrows.
Mentions: The banana cerebellum sign is one of the many notable fruit-inspired signs, such as the “lemon sign”. In neural tube defects, folding of the cerebellum around the posterior brain stem due to inferior traction of the spinal cord causes the cerebellum to take the form of a banana. It has been reported that it may be present in 57% of fetuses with neural tube defect. In fetal hydrocephalus, a cerebellar deformation is observed in conjunction with ventriculomegaly and deletion of cisterna magna. In these cases, the cerebellum loses its normal central convexity and becomes compressed parallelly to the occipital bone, resembling a banana (Figure 21) [24].

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.