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Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Post-contrast axial CT image showing the cortical veins (black arrows).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f15-poljradiol-79-479: Post-contrast axial CT image showing the cortical veins (black arrows).

Mentions: This was first described in MRI and also reported later on US and CT. It is used to differentiate extra-axial subarachnoid and subdural effusions from each other. On both CT and MRI, bridging veins extend from the cortical surface to the arachnoid (Figure 15). Appearance of bridging veins coursing in that manner in the extra-axial fluid is called a positive cortical vein sign and indicates that the fluid is located subarachnoidally. The fluid is located subdurally when these veins are invisible [18].


Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Post-contrast axial CT image showing the cortical veins (black arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f15-poljradiol-79-479: Post-contrast axial CT image showing the cortical veins (black arrows).
Mentions: This was first described in MRI and also reported later on US and CT. It is used to differentiate extra-axial subarachnoid and subdural effusions from each other. On both CT and MRI, bridging veins extend from the cortical surface to the arachnoid (Figure 15). Appearance of bridging veins coursing in that manner in the extra-axial fluid is called a positive cortical vein sign and indicates that the fluid is located subarachnoidally. The fluid is located subdurally when these veins are invisible [18].

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.