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Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The b=1000 s/mm2 DWI showing an acute infarct as “light bulb” bright.
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f12-poljradiol-79-479: The b=1000 s/mm2 DWI showing an acute infarct as “light bulb” bright.

Mentions: Diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging is the method that can delineate ischemic lesions in the brain at the earliest stage. With the help of this method, this lesion can be demonstrated after the onset of the event. The ischemic area shines like a light bulb at this stage (it appears darker on ADC images) (Figure 12). This area forms the core of the infarcted region. The brightness diminishes by the 2nd–3rd month. In this way, acute and chronic infracts can be distinguished or acute lesions can be defined in patients with multiple lesions of varying age. The marked increase in DWI signal in areas of acute ischemia, relative to unaffected brain, is typically so striking that this finding has been referred to as the “light bulb sign” of acute stroke [15].


Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

The b=1000 s/mm2 DWI showing an acute infarct as “light bulb” bright.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f12-poljradiol-79-479: The b=1000 s/mm2 DWI showing an acute infarct as “light bulb” bright.
Mentions: Diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging is the method that can delineate ischemic lesions in the brain at the earliest stage. With the help of this method, this lesion can be demonstrated after the onset of the event. The ischemic area shines like a light bulb at this stage (it appears darker on ADC images) (Figure 12). This area forms the core of the infarcted region. The brightness diminishes by the 2nd–3rd month. In this way, acute and chronic infracts can be distinguished or acute lesions can be defined in patients with multiple lesions of varying age. The marked increase in DWI signal in areas of acute ischemia, relative to unaffected brain, is typically so striking that this finding has been referred to as the “light bulb sign” of acute stroke [15].

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus