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Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

”Lemon sign” is seen in the frontal bones in a fetus with myeloschisis, as detected in an obstetrical US performed at the 20th week of gestation (white arrows).
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f4-poljradiol-79-479: ”Lemon sign” is seen in the frontal bones in a fetus with myeloschisis, as detected in an obstetrical US performed at the 20th week of gestation (white arrows).

Mentions: The lemon sign is useful in identification of spina bifida and is commonly associated with hydrocephalus and Chiari II malformation. Loss of normal convex contour of the frontal bones in transverse fetal sonogram obtained at biparietal diameter (Figure 4). It has a high sensitivity and specifity in high-risk patients before the 24th gestational week. However, it is not specific for spina bifida and may be detected in encephalocele, Dandy-Walker malformation, thanatophoric dysplasia, cystic hygroma, corpus callosum agenesis, hydronephrosis, and umbilical vein varices [4].


Classical signs and appearances in pediatric neuroradiology: a pictorial review.

Atalar MH, Salk I, Egilmez H - Pol J Radiol (2014)

”Lemon sign” is seen in the frontal bones in a fetus with myeloschisis, as detected in an obstetrical US performed at the 20th week of gestation (white arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4274733&req=5

f4-poljradiol-79-479: ”Lemon sign” is seen in the frontal bones in a fetus with myeloschisis, as detected in an obstetrical US performed at the 20th week of gestation (white arrows).
Mentions: The lemon sign is useful in identification of spina bifida and is commonly associated with hydrocephalus and Chiari II malformation. Loss of normal convex contour of the frontal bones in transverse fetal sonogram obtained at biparietal diameter (Figure 4). It has a high sensitivity and specifity in high-risk patients before the 24th gestational week. However, it is not specific for spina bifida and may be detected in encephalocele, Dandy-Walker malformation, thanatophoric dysplasia, cystic hygroma, corpus callosum agenesis, hydronephrosis, and umbilical vein varices [4].

Bottom Line: Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs.In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Cumhuriyet University, School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Radiological practice includes classification of illnesses with similar characteristics through recognizable signs. In this report, twenty-eight important and frequently seen neuroradiological signs in childhood are presented and described using X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) images, illustrations and photographs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus