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Vector-borne disease intelligence: strategies to deal with disease burden and threats.

Braks M, Medlock JM, Hubalek Z, Hjertqvist M, Perrin Y, Lancelot R, Duchyene E, Hendrickx G, Stroo A, Heyman P, Sprong H - Front Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Knowledge on the presence and distribution of vectors and the pathogens that they transmit is vital to the risk assessment process to permit effective early warning, surveillance, and control of VBDs.By classifying the surveillance structure into five different contexts, we hope to provide guidance in optimizing surveillance efforts.Contextual surveillance strategies for VBDs entail combining organization and data collection approaches that result in disease intelligence rather than a preset static structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, Netherlands National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) , Bilthoven , Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Owing to the complex nature of vector-borne diseases (VBDs), whereby monitoring of human case patients does not suffice, public health authorities experience challenges in surveillance and control of VBDs. Knowledge on the presence and distribution of vectors and the pathogens that they transmit is vital to the risk assessment process to permit effective early warning, surveillance, and control of VBDs. Upon accepting this reality, public health authorities face an ever-increasing range of possible surveillance targets and an associated prioritization process. Here, we propose a comprehensive approach that integrates three surveillance strategies: population-based surveillance, disease-based surveillance, and context-based surveillance for EU member states to tailor the best surveillance strategy for control of VBDs in their geographic region. By classifying the surveillance structure into five different contexts, we hope to provide guidance in optimizing surveillance efforts. Contextual surveillance strategies for VBDs entail combining organization and data collection approaches that result in disease intelligence rather than a preset static structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographic distribution of major vectors in Europe: ticks: Hyalomma marginatum, vector of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (top left), Ixodes ricinus, vector of Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (top right), and Ae. albopictus (bottom left) and Ae. aegypti (bottom right), vectors of dengue (source: ECDC).
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Figure 5: Geographic distribution of major vectors in Europe: ticks: Hyalomma marginatum, vector of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (top left), Ixodes ricinus, vector of Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (top right), and Ae. albopictus (bottom left) and Ae. aegypti (bottom right), vectors of dengue (source: ECDC).

Mentions: Context 5 deals with VBDs that currently do not pose any risk to the country owing to the current absence of both the pathogen and vector. The main concern centers therefore on the future establishment of the vector upon its introduction. Surveillance of pathogens and/or human cases is not a priority at this stage. If vector establishment on the basis of climatic or environmental constraints is impossible or highly improbable, no surveillance activities are recommended. However, this assessment needs to be iterative accounting for changes in the geographic distribution of the vectors in Europe.


Vector-borne disease intelligence: strategies to deal with disease burden and threats.

Braks M, Medlock JM, Hubalek Z, Hjertqvist M, Perrin Y, Lancelot R, Duchyene E, Hendrickx G, Stroo A, Heyman P, Sprong H - Front Public Health (2014)

Geographic distribution of major vectors in Europe: ticks: Hyalomma marginatum, vector of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (top left), Ixodes ricinus, vector of Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (top right), and Ae. albopictus (bottom left) and Ae. aegypti (bottom right), vectors of dengue (source: ECDC).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4273637&req=5

Figure 5: Geographic distribution of major vectors in Europe: ticks: Hyalomma marginatum, vector of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (top left), Ixodes ricinus, vector of Lyme borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis (top right), and Ae. albopictus (bottom left) and Ae. aegypti (bottom right), vectors of dengue (source: ECDC).
Mentions: Context 5 deals with VBDs that currently do not pose any risk to the country owing to the current absence of both the pathogen and vector. The main concern centers therefore on the future establishment of the vector upon its introduction. Surveillance of pathogens and/or human cases is not a priority at this stage. If vector establishment on the basis of climatic or environmental constraints is impossible or highly improbable, no surveillance activities are recommended. However, this assessment needs to be iterative accounting for changes in the geographic distribution of the vectors in Europe.

Bottom Line: Knowledge on the presence and distribution of vectors and the pathogens that they transmit is vital to the risk assessment process to permit effective early warning, surveillance, and control of VBDs.By classifying the surveillance structure into five different contexts, we hope to provide guidance in optimizing surveillance efforts.Contextual surveillance strategies for VBDs entail combining organization and data collection approaches that result in disease intelligence rather than a preset static structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology, Netherlands National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) , Bilthoven , Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Owing to the complex nature of vector-borne diseases (VBDs), whereby monitoring of human case patients does not suffice, public health authorities experience challenges in surveillance and control of VBDs. Knowledge on the presence and distribution of vectors and the pathogens that they transmit is vital to the risk assessment process to permit effective early warning, surveillance, and control of VBDs. Upon accepting this reality, public health authorities face an ever-increasing range of possible surveillance targets and an associated prioritization process. Here, we propose a comprehensive approach that integrates three surveillance strategies: population-based surveillance, disease-based surveillance, and context-based surveillance for EU member states to tailor the best surveillance strategy for control of VBDs in their geographic region. By classifying the surveillance structure into five different contexts, we hope to provide guidance in optimizing surveillance efforts. Contextual surveillance strategies for VBDs entail combining organization and data collection approaches that result in disease intelligence rather than a preset static structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus