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Advancing research on racial-ethnic health disparities: improving measurement equivalence in studies with diverse samples.

Landrine H, Corral I - Front Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The racial-ethnic groups must also be equally familiar with and have similar responses to the methods and measures used to collect health data, must have equal opportunity to participate in the research, and must be equally representative of their respective populations.Those correlates render the samples, methods, and measures incomparable across racial-ethnic groups, and diminish the ability to attribute health differences discovered to race-ethnicity vs. to its correlates.This paper reviews the non-equivalent yet normative samples, methodologies and measures used in epidemiologic studies of racial-ethnic health disparities, and provides concrete suggestions for improving sample, method, and scalar measurement equivalence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Health Disparities, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University , Greenville, NC , USA.

ABSTRACT
To conduct meaningful, epidemiologic research on racial-ethnic health disparities, racial-ethnic samples must be rendered equivalent on other social status and contextual variables via statistical controls of those extraneous factors. The racial-ethnic groups must also be equally familiar with and have similar responses to the methods and measures used to collect health data, must have equal opportunity to participate in the research, and must be equally representative of their respective populations. In the absence of such measurement equivalence, studies of racial-ethnic health disparities are confounded by a plethora of unmeasured, uncontrolled correlates of race-ethnicity. Those correlates render the samples, methods, and measures incomparable across racial-ethnic groups, and diminish the ability to attribute health differences discovered to race-ethnicity vs. to its correlates. This paper reviews the non-equivalent yet normative samples, methodologies and measures used in epidemiologic studies of racial-ethnic health disparities, and provides concrete suggestions for improving sample, method, and scalar measurement equivalence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated lifetime cancer risk associated with exposure to ambient air toxics in low, high, and extremely-high segregated neighborhoods.
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Figure 1: Estimated lifetime cancer risk associated with exposure to ambient air toxics in low, high, and extremely-high segregated neighborhoods.

Mentions: There are relatively few studies of segregation and health among other REMs. The growing literature on Latinos, however, reveals that many findings for segregated blacks hold for segregated Latinos as well. For example, Latinos who reside in high-segregated Latino neighborhoods (compared to those who reside in low-segregated areas) have significantly higher prevalence of preterm birth (155) and of obesity (158, 188), and lower levels of physical activity (189). Moreover, the cancer risk associated with exposure to air toxics is higher in black, Latino, Native American, and Asian neighborhoods than in white neighborhoods (29). Indeed, such exposure and risk are highest in extremely segregated Latino neighborhoods and lowest in extremely segregated white neighborhood as shown in Figure 1 [(29), p. 391].


Advancing research on racial-ethnic health disparities: improving measurement equivalence in studies with diverse samples.

Landrine H, Corral I - Front Public Health (2014)

Estimated lifetime cancer risk associated with exposure to ambient air toxics in low, high, and extremely-high segregated neighborhoods.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4273553&req=5

Figure 1: Estimated lifetime cancer risk associated with exposure to ambient air toxics in low, high, and extremely-high segregated neighborhoods.
Mentions: There are relatively few studies of segregation and health among other REMs. The growing literature on Latinos, however, reveals that many findings for segregated blacks hold for segregated Latinos as well. For example, Latinos who reside in high-segregated Latino neighborhoods (compared to those who reside in low-segregated areas) have significantly higher prevalence of preterm birth (155) and of obesity (158, 188), and lower levels of physical activity (189). Moreover, the cancer risk associated with exposure to air toxics is higher in black, Latino, Native American, and Asian neighborhoods than in white neighborhoods (29). Indeed, such exposure and risk are highest in extremely segregated Latino neighborhoods and lowest in extremely segregated white neighborhood as shown in Figure 1 [(29), p. 391].

Bottom Line: The racial-ethnic groups must also be equally familiar with and have similar responses to the methods and measures used to collect health data, must have equal opportunity to participate in the research, and must be equally representative of their respective populations.Those correlates render the samples, methods, and measures incomparable across racial-ethnic groups, and diminish the ability to attribute health differences discovered to race-ethnicity vs. to its correlates.This paper reviews the non-equivalent yet normative samples, methodologies and measures used in epidemiologic studies of racial-ethnic health disparities, and provides concrete suggestions for improving sample, method, and scalar measurement equivalence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Health Disparities, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University , Greenville, NC , USA.

ABSTRACT
To conduct meaningful, epidemiologic research on racial-ethnic health disparities, racial-ethnic samples must be rendered equivalent on other social status and contextual variables via statistical controls of those extraneous factors. The racial-ethnic groups must also be equally familiar with and have similar responses to the methods and measures used to collect health data, must have equal opportunity to participate in the research, and must be equally representative of their respective populations. In the absence of such measurement equivalence, studies of racial-ethnic health disparities are confounded by a plethora of unmeasured, uncontrolled correlates of race-ethnicity. Those correlates render the samples, methods, and measures incomparable across racial-ethnic groups, and diminish the ability to attribute health differences discovered to race-ethnicity vs. to its correlates. This paper reviews the non-equivalent yet normative samples, methodologies and measures used in epidemiologic studies of racial-ethnic health disparities, and provides concrete suggestions for improving sample, method, and scalar measurement equivalence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus