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Anesthesia for ORL surgery in children.

Becke K - GMS Curr Top Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: ORL procedures are the most common operations in children - an optimal anesthetic management provides an uncomplicated, safe perioperative process with as little discomfort for the child as possible.Children at risk must already be identified preoperatively: the combination of ORL surgery, airway susceptibility and age below 3 years can increase the risk of perioperative respiratory adverse events.Interdisciplinary guidelines and agreements as well as the overall competence of the team have the potential to improve patient safety and outcome in children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Abteilung für Anästhesie und Intensivmedizin, Klinik Hallerwiese/Cnopf'sche Kinderklinik, Diakonie Neuendettelsau, Nürnberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
ORL procedures are the most common operations in children - an optimal anesthetic management provides an uncomplicated, safe perioperative process with as little discomfort for the child as possible. Children at risk must already be identified preoperatively: the combination of ORL surgery, airway susceptibility and age below 3 years can increase the risk of perioperative respiratory adverse events. Postoperatively, it is important to prevent complications such as pain and PONV by dedicated prevention and treatment strategies, as well as to recognize and treat respiratory or circulatory complications competently. Interdisciplinary guidelines and agreements as well as the overall competence of the team have the potential to improve patient safety and outcome in children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Algorithm “Child with a cold”With friendly permission of Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins [23]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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Figure 2: Algorithm “Child with a cold”With friendly permission of Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins [23]

Mentions: Today the question whether, and if, yes, for how long an operation/anesthesia should be postponed in a child with upper respiratory tract infection can be answered more differentiated than in the past. An individual risk benefit analysis is indicated [23], [24]. Algorithms can be helpful (Figure 2 (Fig. 2), [23], [25]).


Anesthesia for ORL surgery in children.

Becke K - GMS Curr Top Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2014)

Algorithm “Child with a cold”With friendly permission of Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins [23]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4273165&req=5

Figure 2: Algorithm “Child with a cold”With friendly permission of Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins [23]
Mentions: Today the question whether, and if, yes, for how long an operation/anesthesia should be postponed in a child with upper respiratory tract infection can be answered more differentiated than in the past. An individual risk benefit analysis is indicated [23], [24]. Algorithms can be helpful (Figure 2 (Fig. 2), [23], [25]).

Bottom Line: ORL procedures are the most common operations in children - an optimal anesthetic management provides an uncomplicated, safe perioperative process with as little discomfort for the child as possible.Children at risk must already be identified preoperatively: the combination of ORL surgery, airway susceptibility and age below 3 years can increase the risk of perioperative respiratory adverse events.Interdisciplinary guidelines and agreements as well as the overall competence of the team have the potential to improve patient safety and outcome in children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Abteilung für Anästhesie und Intensivmedizin, Klinik Hallerwiese/Cnopf'sche Kinderklinik, Diakonie Neuendettelsau, Nürnberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
ORL procedures are the most common operations in children - an optimal anesthetic management provides an uncomplicated, safe perioperative process with as little discomfort for the child as possible. Children at risk must already be identified preoperatively: the combination of ORL surgery, airway susceptibility and age below 3 years can increase the risk of perioperative respiratory adverse events. Postoperatively, it is important to prevent complications such as pain and PONV by dedicated prevention and treatment strategies, as well as to recognize and treat respiratory or circulatory complications competently. Interdisciplinary guidelines and agreements as well as the overall competence of the team have the potential to improve patient safety and outcome in children.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus