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Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones.

Mast JD, De Moraes CM, Alborn HT, Lavis LD, Stern DL - Elife (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae.This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae.Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States.

ABSTRACT
Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects.

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A synaptic silencing screen to identify sensory neurons required for attractive pheromone-driven behavior.We silenced subsets of candidate sensory neurons with tetanus toxin, using a collection of driver lines from the Janelia enhancer GAL4 collection that drive expression in anterior sensory neurons. Data points represent the preference index scores of individual larvae for the larval cue in the assay shown in Figure 1A. Means (horizontal red lines) ± one standard deviation (vertical black lines) are plotted beside the data.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04205.006
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fig1s3: A synaptic silencing screen to identify sensory neurons required for attractive pheromone-driven behavior.We silenced subsets of candidate sensory neurons with tetanus toxin, using a collection of driver lines from the Janelia enhancer GAL4 collection that drive expression in anterior sensory neurons. Data points represent the preference index scores of individual larvae for the larval cue in the assay shown in Figure 1A. Means (horizontal red lines) ± one standard deviation (vertical black lines) are plotted beside the data.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04205.006

Mentions: To refine the identity of candidate pheromone receptor neurons further, we screened a subset of the Janelia enhancer fragment GAL4 lines (Jenett et al., 2012) that were characterized as driving sparse patterns of expression in anterior sensory neurons (Li et al., 2013). We drove tetanus toxin with each line and found that neuronal inactivation in several lines blocked the larval attraction to larval residue (Figure 1B and Figure 1—figure supplement 3). We focused further experiments on one of these lines that failed to respond to the larval residue, R58F10, and that drives expression in only a single bilateral TO dorsolateral neuron (Figure 1C,F). This neuron is therefore a subset of the three TO dorsolateral neurons marked by ppk23. R58F10 neurons send straight, mostly unbranched projections into the subesophagael zone (Figure 1G).


Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones.

Mast JD, De Moraes CM, Alborn HT, Lavis LD, Stern DL - Elife (2014)

A synaptic silencing screen to identify sensory neurons required for attractive pheromone-driven behavior.We silenced subsets of candidate sensory neurons with tetanus toxin, using a collection of driver lines from the Janelia enhancer GAL4 collection that drive expression in anterior sensory neurons. Data points represent the preference index scores of individual larvae for the larval cue in the assay shown in Figure 1A. Means (horizontal red lines) ± one standard deviation (vertical black lines) are plotted beside the data.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04205.006
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4270068&req=5

fig1s3: A synaptic silencing screen to identify sensory neurons required for attractive pheromone-driven behavior.We silenced subsets of candidate sensory neurons with tetanus toxin, using a collection of driver lines from the Janelia enhancer GAL4 collection that drive expression in anterior sensory neurons. Data points represent the preference index scores of individual larvae for the larval cue in the assay shown in Figure 1A. Means (horizontal red lines) ± one standard deviation (vertical black lines) are plotted beside the data.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04205.006
Mentions: To refine the identity of candidate pheromone receptor neurons further, we screened a subset of the Janelia enhancer fragment GAL4 lines (Jenett et al., 2012) that were characterized as driving sparse patterns of expression in anterior sensory neurons (Li et al., 2013). We drove tetanus toxin with each line and found that neuronal inactivation in several lines blocked the larval attraction to larval residue (Figure 1B and Figure 1—figure supplement 3). We focused further experiments on one of these lines that failed to respond to the larval residue, R58F10, and that drives expression in only a single bilateral TO dorsolateral neuron (Figure 1C,F). This neuron is therefore a subset of the three TO dorsolateral neurons marked by ppk23. R58F10 neurons send straight, mostly unbranched projections into the subesophagael zone (Figure 1G).

Bottom Line: We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae.This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae.Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, United States.

ABSTRACT
Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus