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Frequency of positive states of mind as a moderator of the effects of stress on psychological functioning and perceived health.

Bränström R - BMC Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: Emerging evidence indicates that individuals reporting more positive affect are healthier and live longer.The aim of this study was to examine if positive states of mind moderates the effect of perceived stress on psychological functioning and perceived health.Using a series of regression analyses, the results confirmed a moderating role of positive states of mind on the association between perceived stress and psychological outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, 171 77 Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence indicates that individuals reporting more positive affect are healthier and live longer. The aim of this study was to examine if positive states of mind moderates the effect of perceived stress on psychological functioning and perceived health.

Methods: A cross-sectional sample, n = 382, responded to questions regarding perceived stress, depression, anxiety, perceived health, and frequency of positive states of mind.

Results: Using a series of regression analyses, the results confirmed a moderating role of positive states of mind on the association between perceived stress and psychological outcomes.

Conclusions: Among people experiencing a high frequency of positive states of mind, perceived stress seems to have a low correspondence with depression, anxiety, and perceived health. But among those reporting a low frequency of positive states of mind, perceived stress was more strongly related and depression, anxiety, and perceived health suggesting a buffering effect of positive states of mind against the negative influence of stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean depression (range 0–21), anxiety (range 0–21), and perceived health score (range 0–100), and 95% confidence intervals are presented to illustrate the moderating effect of Positive States of Mind on the association between perceived stress and depression; anxiety; and global health score.
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Fig1: Mean depression (range 0–21), anxiety (range 0–21), and perceived health score (range 0–100), and 95% confidence intervals are presented to illustrate the moderating effect of Positive States of Mind on the association between perceived stress and depression; anxiety; and global health score.

Mentions: Regression analyses showed that perceived stress was strongly associated with the outcome variables and accounted for a substantial portion of variance in depression (β = 0.61, R2 = 0.34, F(1, 314) = 182.60, p < 0.001), anxiety (β = 0.71, R2 = 0.47, F(1, 311) = 314.64, p < 0.001), and perceived health (β = −0.57, R2 = 0.30, F(1, 314) = 147.17, p < 0.001). Positive states of mind was added to the regression analyses and added a significant proportion of explained variance in depression (β = −0.37, R2 = 0.10, F(1, 313) = 60.88, p < 0.001), anxiety (β = −0.21, R2 = 0.03, F(1, 310) = 20.70, p < 0.001), and perceived health (β = 0.36, R2 = 0.09, F(1, 313) = 51.49, p < 0.001). Further analyses testing for the moderating role of PSOM on the association between perceived stress and psychological outcomes showed that the interaction term for the PSOM and perceived stress (PSOM × Perceived stress) accounted for an additional significant proportion of the variance in depression (β = −0.23, R2Δ = 0.05, FΔ (1, 312) = 34.68, p < 0.001), anxiety (β = −0.10, R2Δ = 0.01, FΔ (1, 309) = 6.52, p < 0.05), and perceived health (β = 0.10, R2Δ = 0.01, FΔ (1, 312) = 5.18, p < 0.05). The moderating effects of positive states of mind on depression, anxiety, and perceived health is illustrated in Figure 1.Figure 1


Frequency of positive states of mind as a moderator of the effects of stress on psychological functioning and perceived health.

Bränström R - BMC Psychol (2013)

Mean depression (range 0–21), anxiety (range 0–21), and perceived health score (range 0–100), and 95% confidence intervals are presented to illustrate the moderating effect of Positive States of Mind on the association between perceived stress and depression; anxiety; and global health score.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4270031&req=5

Fig1: Mean depression (range 0–21), anxiety (range 0–21), and perceived health score (range 0–100), and 95% confidence intervals are presented to illustrate the moderating effect of Positive States of Mind on the association between perceived stress and depression; anxiety; and global health score.
Mentions: Regression analyses showed that perceived stress was strongly associated with the outcome variables and accounted for a substantial portion of variance in depression (β = 0.61, R2 = 0.34, F(1, 314) = 182.60, p < 0.001), anxiety (β = 0.71, R2 = 0.47, F(1, 311) = 314.64, p < 0.001), and perceived health (β = −0.57, R2 = 0.30, F(1, 314) = 147.17, p < 0.001). Positive states of mind was added to the regression analyses and added a significant proportion of explained variance in depression (β = −0.37, R2 = 0.10, F(1, 313) = 60.88, p < 0.001), anxiety (β = −0.21, R2 = 0.03, F(1, 310) = 20.70, p < 0.001), and perceived health (β = 0.36, R2 = 0.09, F(1, 313) = 51.49, p < 0.001). Further analyses testing for the moderating role of PSOM on the association between perceived stress and psychological outcomes showed that the interaction term for the PSOM and perceived stress (PSOM × Perceived stress) accounted for an additional significant proportion of the variance in depression (β = −0.23, R2Δ = 0.05, FΔ (1, 312) = 34.68, p < 0.001), anxiety (β = −0.10, R2Δ = 0.01, FΔ (1, 309) = 6.52, p < 0.05), and perceived health (β = 0.10, R2Δ = 0.01, FΔ (1, 312) = 5.18, p < 0.05). The moderating effects of positive states of mind on depression, anxiety, and perceived health is illustrated in Figure 1.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Emerging evidence indicates that individuals reporting more positive affect are healthier and live longer.The aim of this study was to examine if positive states of mind moderates the effect of perceived stress on psychological functioning and perceived health.Using a series of regression analyses, the results confirmed a moderating role of positive states of mind on the association between perceived stress and psychological outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, 171 77 Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence indicates that individuals reporting more positive affect are healthier and live longer. The aim of this study was to examine if positive states of mind moderates the effect of perceived stress on psychological functioning and perceived health.

Methods: A cross-sectional sample, n = 382, responded to questions regarding perceived stress, depression, anxiety, perceived health, and frequency of positive states of mind.

Results: Using a series of regression analyses, the results confirmed a moderating role of positive states of mind on the association between perceived stress and psychological outcomes.

Conclusions: Among people experiencing a high frequency of positive states of mind, perceived stress seems to have a low correspondence with depression, anxiety, and perceived health. But among those reporting a low frequency of positive states of mind, perceived stress was more strongly related and depression, anxiety, and perceived health suggesting a buffering effect of positive states of mind against the negative influence of stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus