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Healthcare costs associated with change in body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain: the ECOBIM study.

Dilla T, Valladares A, Nicolay C, Salvador J, Reviriego J, Costi M - Appl Health Econ Health Policy (2012)

Bottom Line: One-unit gain (or loss) in BMI was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with a 2.4% cost increase (or decrease) [one-slope model].The economic benefit associated with reducing one BMI unit was 9.4% cost decrease in obese and 2.7% in non-obese patients (4-slope model).A reduction in BMI was associated with appreciable short-term economic benefits, especially in obese patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Department, Lilly, Alcobendas, Madrid, Spain. dilla_tatiana@lilly.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Weight management is considered a key therapeutic strategy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, little is known about the impact of weight loss or body mass index (BMI) reduction on type 2 diabetes-related healthcare costs.

Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the economic impact of change in BMI among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Spanish healthcare system perspective.

Methods: The ECOBIM study is an observational, non-interventional study in which data on BMI change and costs incurred by patients with type 2 diabetes were collected cross-sectionally and retrospectively for a 12-month period. Generalized linear mixed models were applied to estimate the effects of (i) BMI change in general (one-slope model); (ii) BMI gain and no BMI gain (two-slope model); and (iii) BMI gain and no BMI gain among obese and non-obese patients (four-slope model).

Results: We studied 738 patients with a mean (SD) age of 66 (11) years and BMI of 30.6 (5.2) kg/m2. During the 12-month study period, 41.2% of patients gained BMI (BMI gainers) and 58.8% experienced either loss (52.2%) or no change (6.6%) in BMI (non-BMI gainers). One-unit gain (or loss) in BMI was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with a 2.4% cost increase (or decrease) [one-slope model]. Every unit gain in BMI was associated with a 20.0% increase in costs among BMI gainers while losing one unit was associated with an 8.0% decrease in costs among non-BMI gainers (two-slope model, p < 0.01). The economic benefit associated with reducing one BMI unit was 9.4% cost decrease in obese and 2.7% in non-obese patients (4-slope model).

Conclusion: An increase in BMI among patients with type 2 diabetes was associated with increased 1-year direct healthcare costs. A reduction in BMI was associated with appreciable short-term economic benefits, especially in obese patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Study design. eCRF=; electronic case report form.
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Fig1: Study design. eCRF=; electronic case report form.

Mentions: The ECOBIM (Economic Impact of BMI on Cost Associated with the Management of Patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) study was an observational, non-interventional, multicentre study conducted in Spain. It consisted of a 12-month observation period (study reference period) for which data were collected retrospectively and cross-sectionally from patients’ medical charts at the study visit (figure 1). All data were provided during usual care and no additional visits, tests or interventions were required. The protocol was approved by Hospital Universitario La Paz ethics committee (Madrid, Spain) and conducted in accordance with the Spanish regulation for observational studies and the Declaration of Helsinki. Patients volunteered for the study and authorized the use of their data according to defined provisions in Law 15/1999 of 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data.


Healthcare costs associated with change in body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain: the ECOBIM study.

Dilla T, Valladares A, Nicolay C, Salvador J, Reviriego J, Costi M - Appl Health Econ Health Policy (2012)

Study design. eCRF=; electronic case report form.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269888&req=5

Fig1: Study design. eCRF=; electronic case report form.
Mentions: The ECOBIM (Economic Impact of BMI on Cost Associated with the Management of Patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) study was an observational, non-interventional, multicentre study conducted in Spain. It consisted of a 12-month observation period (study reference period) for which data were collected retrospectively and cross-sectionally from patients’ medical charts at the study visit (figure 1). All data were provided during usual care and no additional visits, tests or interventions were required. The protocol was approved by Hospital Universitario La Paz ethics committee (Madrid, Spain) and conducted in accordance with the Spanish regulation for observational studies and the Declaration of Helsinki. Patients volunteered for the study and authorized the use of their data according to defined provisions in Law 15/1999 of 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data.

Bottom Line: One-unit gain (or loss) in BMI was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with a 2.4% cost increase (or decrease) [one-slope model].The economic benefit associated with reducing one BMI unit was 9.4% cost decrease in obese and 2.7% in non-obese patients (4-slope model).A reduction in BMI was associated with appreciable short-term economic benefits, especially in obese patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Department, Lilly, Alcobendas, Madrid, Spain. dilla_tatiana@lilly.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Weight management is considered a key therapeutic strategy in type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, little is known about the impact of weight loss or body mass index (BMI) reduction on type 2 diabetes-related healthcare costs.

Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the economic impact of change in BMI among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Spanish healthcare system perspective.

Methods: The ECOBIM study is an observational, non-interventional study in which data on BMI change and costs incurred by patients with type 2 diabetes were collected cross-sectionally and retrospectively for a 12-month period. Generalized linear mixed models were applied to estimate the effects of (i) BMI change in general (one-slope model); (ii) BMI gain and no BMI gain (two-slope model); and (iii) BMI gain and no BMI gain among obese and non-obese patients (four-slope model).

Results: We studied 738 patients with a mean (SD) age of 66 (11) years and BMI of 30.6 (5.2) kg/m2. During the 12-month study period, 41.2% of patients gained BMI (BMI gainers) and 58.8% experienced either loss (52.2%) or no change (6.6%) in BMI (non-BMI gainers). One-unit gain (or loss) in BMI was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with a 2.4% cost increase (or decrease) [one-slope model]. Every unit gain in BMI was associated with a 20.0% increase in costs among BMI gainers while losing one unit was associated with an 8.0% decrease in costs among non-BMI gainers (two-slope model, p < 0.01). The economic benefit associated with reducing one BMI unit was 9.4% cost decrease in obese and 2.7% in non-obese patients (4-slope model).

Conclusion: An increase in BMI among patients with type 2 diabetes was associated with increased 1-year direct healthcare costs. A reduction in BMI was associated with appreciable short-term economic benefits, especially in obese patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus