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Reducing X-Ray Induced Oxidative Damages in Fibroblasts with Graphene Oxide.

Qiao Y, Zhang P, Wang C, Ma L, Su M - Nanomaterials (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: A major issue of X-ray radiation therapy is that normal cells can be damaged, limiting the amount of X-rays that can be safely delivered to a tumor.A variety of techniques such as cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative assay, apoptosis, γ-H2AX expression, and micro-nucleus assay have been used to assess the protective effect of GO in cultured fibroblast cells.Thus, low concentration GO can be used as an effective radio-protective agent in occupational and therapeutic settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609, USA.

ABSTRACT

A major issue of X-ray radiation therapy is that normal cells can be damaged, limiting the amount of X-rays that can be safely delivered to a tumor. This paper describes a new method based on graphene oxide (GO) to protect normal cells from oxidative damage by removing free radicals generated by X-ray radiation using grapheme oxide (GO). A variety of techniques such as cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative assay, apoptosis, γ-H2AX expression, and micro-nucleus assay have been used to assess the protective effect of GO in cultured fibroblast cells. It is found that although GO at higher concentration (100 and 500 μg/mL) can cause cell death and DNA damage, it can effectively remove oxygen free radicals at a lower concentration of 10 μg/mL. The level of DNA damage and cell death is reduced by 48%, and 39%, respectively. Thus, low concentration GO can be used as an effective radio-protective agent in occupational and therapeutic settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluorescence images of cells exposed to X-ray, where a bi-nucleated fibroblast has no micronucleus (A); one micronucleus (B); two micronuclei (C); a nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) (D); and a nuclear bud (NBUD) (E); the appearance frequency of micronucleus of four samples (F), where cells are arrested at inter-phase stage. “*” (p < 0.05) and “**” (p < 0.01) represent significant difference and extra significant difference, respectively.
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Figure 6: Fluorescence images of cells exposed to X-ray, where a bi-nucleated fibroblast has no micronucleus (A); one micronucleus (B); two micronuclei (C); a nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) (D); and a nuclear bud (NBUD) (E); the appearance frequency of micronucleus of four samples (F), where cells are arrested at inter-phase stage. “*” (p < 0.05) and “**” (p < 0.01) represent significant difference and extra significant difference, respectively.

Mentions: Micronucleus assay can detect chromosome integrity of cells [35]. Four samples have been studied: (1) cells; (2) cells treated with 10 μg/mL; (3) cells exposed to 1.25 Gy X-ray and (4) cells treated with 10 μg/mL GO and then exposed to 1.25 Gy X-ray. Figure 6A–E shows the fluorescence images of cells exposed to X-ray, where a bi-nucleated fibroblast has no micronucleus (A); one micronucleus (B); two micronuclei (C); a nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) (D); and a nuclear bud (NBUD) (E). Figure 6F shows the appearance frequency of micronucleus for four types of samples, where Cyt B is added to arrest cells at inter-phase stage. 1.25 Gy X-ray radiation can induce a significant increase (5.6%) in micronucleus frequency over untreated cells (0.5%), and 10 μg/mL GO treated cells (0.7%). In comparison, the frequency of micronucleus in GO treated and X-ray exposed cells is 1.8%, which is significantly lower than cells treated with X-ray alone.


Reducing X-Ray Induced Oxidative Damages in Fibroblasts with Graphene Oxide.

Qiao Y, Zhang P, Wang C, Ma L, Su M - Nanomaterials (Basel) (2014)

Fluorescence images of cells exposed to X-ray, where a bi-nucleated fibroblast has no micronucleus (A); one micronucleus (B); two micronuclei (C); a nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) (D); and a nuclear bud (NBUD) (E); the appearance frequency of micronucleus of four samples (F), where cells are arrested at inter-phase stage. “*” (p < 0.05) and “**” (p < 0.01) represent significant difference and extra significant difference, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269382&req=5

Figure 6: Fluorescence images of cells exposed to X-ray, where a bi-nucleated fibroblast has no micronucleus (A); one micronucleus (B); two micronuclei (C); a nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) (D); and a nuclear bud (NBUD) (E); the appearance frequency of micronucleus of four samples (F), where cells are arrested at inter-phase stage. “*” (p < 0.05) and “**” (p < 0.01) represent significant difference and extra significant difference, respectively.
Mentions: Micronucleus assay can detect chromosome integrity of cells [35]. Four samples have been studied: (1) cells; (2) cells treated with 10 μg/mL; (3) cells exposed to 1.25 Gy X-ray and (4) cells treated with 10 μg/mL GO and then exposed to 1.25 Gy X-ray. Figure 6A–E shows the fluorescence images of cells exposed to X-ray, where a bi-nucleated fibroblast has no micronucleus (A); one micronucleus (B); two micronuclei (C); a nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) (D); and a nuclear bud (NBUD) (E). Figure 6F shows the appearance frequency of micronucleus for four types of samples, where Cyt B is added to arrest cells at inter-phase stage. 1.25 Gy X-ray radiation can induce a significant increase (5.6%) in micronucleus frequency over untreated cells (0.5%), and 10 μg/mL GO treated cells (0.7%). In comparison, the frequency of micronucleus in GO treated and X-ray exposed cells is 1.8%, which is significantly lower than cells treated with X-ray alone.

Bottom Line: A major issue of X-ray radiation therapy is that normal cells can be damaged, limiting the amount of X-rays that can be safely delivered to a tumor.A variety of techniques such as cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative assay, apoptosis, γ-H2AX expression, and micro-nucleus assay have been used to assess the protective effect of GO in cultured fibroblast cells.Thus, low concentration GO can be used as an effective radio-protective agent in occupational and therapeutic settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609, USA.

ABSTRACT

A major issue of X-ray radiation therapy is that normal cells can be damaged, limiting the amount of X-rays that can be safely delivered to a tumor. This paper describes a new method based on graphene oxide (GO) to protect normal cells from oxidative damage by removing free radicals generated by X-ray radiation using grapheme oxide (GO). A variety of techniques such as cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative assay, apoptosis, γ-H2AX expression, and micro-nucleus assay have been used to assess the protective effect of GO in cultured fibroblast cells. It is found that although GO at higher concentration (100 and 500 μg/mL) can cause cell death and DNA damage, it can effectively remove oxygen free radicals at a lower concentration of 10 μg/mL. The level of DNA damage and cell death is reduced by 48%, and 39%, respectively. Thus, low concentration GO can be used as an effective radio-protective agent in occupational and therapeutic settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus