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Interacting hands: the role of attention for the joint Simon effect.

Liepelt R - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect.Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor.This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychology, University of Muenster Muenster, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Recent research in monkeys and humans has shown that the presence of the hands near an object enhances spatial processing for objects presented near the hand. This study aimed to test the effect of hand position on the joint Simon effect. In Experiment 1, two human co-actors shared a Simon task while placing their response hands either near the objects appearing on the monitor or away from the monitor. Experiment 2 varied each co-actor's hand position independently. Experiment 3 tested whether enhanced spatial processing for objects presented near the hand is obtained when replacing one of the two co-actors by a non-human event-producing rubber hand. Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect. Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor. Experiment 2 replicated this finding showing an increased Simon effect when the actor's hand was located near the objects on the monitor, but only when the co-actor also produced action events in spatial reference. A similar hand position effect was observed in Experiment 3 when a non-human rubber hand replaced the human co-actor. These findings suggest that external action events that are produced in spatial reference bias the distribution of attention to the area near the hand. This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 3. The same hand position manipulation was used as in Experiment 2, but in Experiment 3, the left human co-actor was replaced by a rubber hand positioned on a response button, which pulled down the index finger of the rubber hand when the square appeared. The figure shows the hands monitor and the hands knee condition for the participant’s own hand and hands monitor and the hands chair condition for the rubber hand.
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Figure 4: Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 3. The same hand position manipulation was used as in Experiment 2, but in Experiment 3, the left human co-actor was replaced by a rubber hand positioned on a response button, which pulled down the index finger of the rubber hand when the square appeared. The figure shows the hands monitor and the hands knee condition for the participant’s own hand and hands monitor and the hands chair condition for the rubber hand.

Mentions: Stimuli and apparatus were the same as in Experiment 2 with the exception that a response device, which was triggered by the computer, replaced the conventional response button on the left side (hands monitor and hands knee conditions). The response device pulled down the index finger of a rubber hand whenever the square appeared on the screen, as in the typical joint Simon task (see Figure 4).


Interacting hands: the role of attention for the joint Simon effect.

Liepelt R - Front Psychol (2014)

Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 3. The same hand position manipulation was used as in Experiment 2, but in Experiment 3, the left human co-actor was replaced by a rubber hand positioned on a response button, which pulled down the index finger of the rubber hand when the square appeared. The figure shows the hands monitor and the hands knee condition for the participant’s own hand and hands monitor and the hands chair condition for the rubber hand.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269294&req=5

Figure 4: Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 3. The same hand position manipulation was used as in Experiment 2, but in Experiment 3, the left human co-actor was replaced by a rubber hand positioned on a response button, which pulled down the index finger of the rubber hand when the square appeared. The figure shows the hands monitor and the hands knee condition for the participant’s own hand and hands monitor and the hands chair condition for the rubber hand.
Mentions: Stimuli and apparatus were the same as in Experiment 2 with the exception that a response device, which was triggered by the computer, replaced the conventional response button on the left side (hands monitor and hands knee conditions). The response device pulled down the index finger of a rubber hand whenever the square appeared on the screen, as in the typical joint Simon task (see Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect.Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor.This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychology, University of Muenster Muenster, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Recent research in monkeys and humans has shown that the presence of the hands near an object enhances spatial processing for objects presented near the hand. This study aimed to test the effect of hand position on the joint Simon effect. In Experiment 1, two human co-actors shared a Simon task while placing their response hands either near the objects appearing on the monitor or away from the monitor. Experiment 2 varied each co-actor's hand position independently. Experiment 3 tested whether enhanced spatial processing for objects presented near the hand is obtained when replacing one of the two co-actors by a non-human event-producing rubber hand. Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect. Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor. Experiment 2 replicated this finding showing an increased Simon effect when the actor's hand was located near the objects on the monitor, but only when the co-actor also produced action events in spatial reference. A similar hand position effect was observed in Experiment 3 when a non-human rubber hand replaced the human co-actor. These findings suggest that external action events that are produced in spatial reference bias the distribution of attention to the area near the hand. This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus