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Interacting hands: the role of attention for the joint Simon effect.

Liepelt R - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect.Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor.This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychology, University of Muenster Muenster, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Recent research in monkeys and humans has shown that the presence of the hands near an object enhances spatial processing for objects presented near the hand. This study aimed to test the effect of hand position on the joint Simon effect. In Experiment 1, two human co-actors shared a Simon task while placing their response hands either near the objects appearing on the monitor or away from the monitor. Experiment 2 varied each co-actor's hand position independently. Experiment 3 tested whether enhanced spatial processing for objects presented near the hand is obtained when replacing one of the two co-actors by a non-human event-producing rubber hand. Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect. Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor. Experiment 2 replicated this finding showing an increased Simon effect when the actor's hand was located near the objects on the monitor, but only when the co-actor also produced action events in spatial reference. A similar hand position effect was observed in Experiment 3 when a non-human rubber hand replaced the human co-actor. These findings suggest that external action events that are produced in spatial reference bias the distribution of attention to the area near the hand. This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 1 (red border) showing two persons sharing a visual Simon task (own hand: right person and other hand: left person) in the hands knee condition (lower right panel) and the hands monitor condition (upper left panel). In Experiment 1, all participants also performed an individual and a standard version of the Simon task using the same hand position manipulation (not shown). Experimental design for the joint Simon task of Experiment 2 (green border) showing the own hands knee – other hands monitor condition (upper right panel) and the own hands monitor – other hands knee condition (lower left panel) in addition.
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Figure 1: Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 1 (red border) showing two persons sharing a visual Simon task (own hand: right person and other hand: left person) in the hands knee condition (lower right panel) and the hands monitor condition (upper left panel). In Experiment 1, all participants also performed an individual and a standard version of the Simon task using the same hand position manipulation (not shown). Experimental design for the joint Simon task of Experiment 2 (green border) showing the own hands knee – other hands monitor condition (upper right panel) and the own hands monitor – other hands knee condition (lower left panel) in addition.

Mentions: Participants were seated in a sound-attenuated, dimly lit room. All stimuli were displayed on a CRT computer monitor (19-inch) in white on a black background at a constant viewing distance of 60 cm. The fixation point at the center of the screen was marked by a plus sign (0.9 × 0.9°). Stimuli consisted of squares and diamonds (1.9 × 1.9°), presented to the left or right of the fixation cross with an eccentricity of 5.7° visual angle. Responses were recorded with two keys. The keys were either placed on participants’ left or right knee or at the left and right side of the computer monitor with a distance of 50 cm from each other (see Figure 1, red border). The distance between response keys in the hands monitor and the hands knee condition was approximately kept constant. This was achieved by placing the response buttons on the outer knees that were matched in distance to the response buttons in the hands monitor condition.


Interacting hands: the role of attention for the joint Simon effect.

Liepelt R - Front Psychol (2014)

Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 1 (red border) showing two persons sharing a visual Simon task (own hand: right person and other hand: left person) in the hands knee condition (lower right panel) and the hands monitor condition (upper left panel). In Experiment 1, all participants also performed an individual and a standard version of the Simon task using the same hand position manipulation (not shown). Experimental design for the joint Simon task of Experiment 2 (green border) showing the own hands knee – other hands monitor condition (upper right panel) and the own hands monitor – other hands knee condition (lower left panel) in addition.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269294&req=5

Figure 1: Experimental design of the joint Simon task of Experiment 1 (red border) showing two persons sharing a visual Simon task (own hand: right person and other hand: left person) in the hands knee condition (lower right panel) and the hands monitor condition (upper left panel). In Experiment 1, all participants also performed an individual and a standard version of the Simon task using the same hand position manipulation (not shown). Experimental design for the joint Simon task of Experiment 2 (green border) showing the own hands knee – other hands monitor condition (upper right panel) and the own hands monitor – other hands knee condition (lower left panel) in addition.
Mentions: Participants were seated in a sound-attenuated, dimly lit room. All stimuli were displayed on a CRT computer monitor (19-inch) in white on a black background at a constant viewing distance of 60 cm. The fixation point at the center of the screen was marked by a plus sign (0.9 × 0.9°). Stimuli consisted of squares and diamonds (1.9 × 1.9°), presented to the left or right of the fixation cross with an eccentricity of 5.7° visual angle. Responses were recorded with two keys. The keys were either placed on participants’ left or right knee or at the left and right side of the computer monitor with a distance of 50 cm from each other (see Figure 1, red border). The distance between response keys in the hands monitor and the hands knee condition was approximately kept constant. This was achieved by placing the response buttons on the outer knees that were matched in distance to the response buttons in the hands monitor condition.

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect.Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor.This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychology, University of Muenster Muenster, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Recent research in monkeys and humans has shown that the presence of the hands near an object enhances spatial processing for objects presented near the hand. This study aimed to test the effect of hand position on the joint Simon effect. In Experiment 1, two human co-actors shared a Simon task while placing their response hands either near the objects appearing on the monitor or away from the monitor. Experiment 2 varied each co-actor's hand position independently. Experiment 3 tested whether enhanced spatial processing for objects presented near the hand is obtained when replacing one of the two co-actors by a non-human event-producing rubber hand. Experiment 1 provided evidence for a Simon effect. Hand position significantly modulated the size of the Simon effect in the joint Simon task showing an increased Simon effect when the hands of both actors were located near the objects on the monitor, than when they were located away from the monitor. Experiment 2 replicated this finding showing an increased Simon effect when the actor's hand was located near the objects on the monitor, but only when the co-actor also produced action events in spatial reference. A similar hand position effect was observed in Experiment 3 when a non-human rubber hand replaced the human co-actor. These findings suggest that external action events that are produced in spatial reference bias the distribution of attention to the area near the hand. This strengthens the weight of the spatial response codes (referential coding) and hence increases the joint Simon effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus