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Distal Clavicle Osteolysis after Modified Weaver-Dunn's Procedure for Chronic Acromioclavicular Dislocation: A Case Report and Review of Complications.

Alentorn-Geli E, Santana F, Mingo F, Piñol I, Solano A, Puig-Verdié L, Torrens C - Case Rep Orthop (2014)

Bottom Line: Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction.This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation.The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Parc de Salut Mar, Hospital del Mar and Hospital de l'Esperança, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Passeig Maritim 25-27, 08003 Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction. This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetic resonance imaging of the acromioclavicular joint in DP fat-suppression sequence demonstrates the osteolysis with no soft tissue reaction or bone edema.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Magnetic resonance imaging of the acromioclavicular joint in DP fat-suppression sequence demonstrates the osteolysis with no soft tissue reaction or bone edema.

Mentions: Plain radiographs 2 weeks and 2 months after surgery demonstrated correct reduction of the AC joint, adequate bone appearance of the clavicle, and no signs of hematoma and infection. In the follow-up visit 6 months after surgery, the patient complained of AC joint pain on palpation but demonstrated full active range of motion. One year after surgery, shoulder function was also complete, but pain was still present on palpation. Plain radiograph at that time showed initial osteolysis of the clavicle. Two years after surgery, the patient's shoulder symptoms and function did not change, but radiographs demonstrated progression of osteolysis (Figure 1). A CT scan confirmed the lateral third clavicle osteolysis and found no associated bone injuries (Figure 2). MRI study confirmed the osteolysis with no bone edema or soft tissue reaction (Figure 3). Despite image findings, the patient currently refers no clinical symptoms except a minimum loss of strength in specific movements over the head. However, the patient is pain free and declines further surgery.


Distal Clavicle Osteolysis after Modified Weaver-Dunn's Procedure for Chronic Acromioclavicular Dislocation: A Case Report and Review of Complications.

Alentorn-Geli E, Santana F, Mingo F, Piñol I, Solano A, Puig-Verdié L, Torrens C - Case Rep Orthop (2014)

Magnetic resonance imaging of the acromioclavicular joint in DP fat-suppression sequence demonstrates the osteolysis with no soft tissue reaction or bone edema.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269279&req=5

fig3: Magnetic resonance imaging of the acromioclavicular joint in DP fat-suppression sequence demonstrates the osteolysis with no soft tissue reaction or bone edema.
Mentions: Plain radiographs 2 weeks and 2 months after surgery demonstrated correct reduction of the AC joint, adequate bone appearance of the clavicle, and no signs of hematoma and infection. In the follow-up visit 6 months after surgery, the patient complained of AC joint pain on palpation but demonstrated full active range of motion. One year after surgery, shoulder function was also complete, but pain was still present on palpation. Plain radiograph at that time showed initial osteolysis of the clavicle. Two years after surgery, the patient's shoulder symptoms and function did not change, but radiographs demonstrated progression of osteolysis (Figure 1). A CT scan confirmed the lateral third clavicle osteolysis and found no associated bone injuries (Figure 2). MRI study confirmed the osteolysis with no bone edema or soft tissue reaction (Figure 3). Despite image findings, the patient currently refers no clinical symptoms except a minimum loss of strength in specific movements over the head. However, the patient is pain free and declines further surgery.

Bottom Line: Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction.This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation.The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Parc de Salut Mar, Hospital del Mar and Hospital de l'Esperança, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Passeig Maritim 25-27, 08003 Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction. This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus