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Compelled Body Weight Shift Technique to Facilitate Rehabilitation of Individuals with Acute Stroke.

Mohapatra S, Eviota AC, Ringquist KL, Muthukrishnan SR, Aruin AS - ISRN Rehabil (2012)

Bottom Line: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group.The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05).However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street (MC 898), Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The study evaluates the effectiveness of Compelled Body Weight Shift (CBWS) approach in the rehabilitation of individuals with stroke. CBWS involves a forced shift of body weight towards a person's affected side by means of a shoe insert that establishes a lift of the nonaffected lower extremity.

Methods: Eleven patients with acute stroke were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received a two-week conventional physical therapy combined with CBWS and the control group received only a two-week conventional therapy. Weight bearing, Gait velocity, Berg's Balance, and Fugl-Meyer's Scores were recorded before and after the intervention.

Results: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group. The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05). However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002). Berg Balance and Fugl-Meyer scores increased for both the groups.

Conclusion: The implementation of a two-week intervention with CBWS resulted in the improvement in weight bearing and gait velocity of individuals with acute stroke. The present preliminary study suggests that CBWS technique could be implemented as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation program for individuals with acute stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in the percentage of weight bearing on the affected side (% of the total body weight). Mean ± SE are shown.
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Figure 2: Changes in the percentage of weight bearing on the affected side (% of the total body weight). Mean ± SE are shown.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the mean group data for weight bearing obtained before the start of intervention and after the end of the intervention. All of the subjects demonstrated asymmetrical weight bearing at the time of the first test: weight bearing of the individuals included in the experimental group was 32.4 ± 0.06 and it was 30.2 ± 0.04 percent of the body weight in the control group. The difference between the experimental and control subjects was not statistically significant (P = 0.89). The mean weight bearing increased after test reaching 37.9 ± 0.05 percent in the experimental group of subjects approaching the level of statistical significance (P = 0.07). The mean weight bearing on the affected side of the subjects in the control group decreased after test to 27.4 ± 0.06; however, such a decrease was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.44).


Compelled Body Weight Shift Technique to Facilitate Rehabilitation of Individuals with Acute Stroke.

Mohapatra S, Eviota AC, Ringquist KL, Muthukrishnan SR, Aruin AS - ISRN Rehabil (2012)

Changes in the percentage of weight bearing on the affected side (% of the total body weight). Mean ± SE are shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269244&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in the percentage of weight bearing on the affected side (% of the total body weight). Mean ± SE are shown.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the mean group data for weight bearing obtained before the start of intervention and after the end of the intervention. All of the subjects demonstrated asymmetrical weight bearing at the time of the first test: weight bearing of the individuals included in the experimental group was 32.4 ± 0.06 and it was 30.2 ± 0.04 percent of the body weight in the control group. The difference between the experimental and control subjects was not statistically significant (P = 0.89). The mean weight bearing increased after test reaching 37.9 ± 0.05 percent in the experimental group of subjects approaching the level of statistical significance (P = 0.07). The mean weight bearing on the affected side of the subjects in the control group decreased after test to 27.4 ± 0.06; however, such a decrease was not statistically significant (P = 0.29). The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.44).

Bottom Line: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group.The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05).However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street (MC 898), Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The study evaluates the effectiveness of Compelled Body Weight Shift (CBWS) approach in the rehabilitation of individuals with stroke. CBWS involves a forced shift of body weight towards a person's affected side by means of a shoe insert that establishes a lift of the nonaffected lower extremity.

Methods: Eleven patients with acute stroke were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received a two-week conventional physical therapy combined with CBWS and the control group received only a two-week conventional therapy. Weight bearing, Gait velocity, Berg's Balance, and Fugl-Meyer's Scores were recorded before and after the intervention.

Results: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group. The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05). However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002). Berg Balance and Fugl-Meyer scores increased for both the groups.

Conclusion: The implementation of a two-week intervention with CBWS resulted in the improvement in weight bearing and gait velocity of individuals with acute stroke. The present preliminary study suggests that CBWS technique could be implemented as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation program for individuals with acute stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus