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Compelled Body Weight Shift Technique to Facilitate Rehabilitation of Individuals with Acute Stroke.

Mohapatra S, Eviota AC, Ringquist KL, Muthukrishnan SR, Aruin AS - ISRN Rehabil (2012)

Bottom Line: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group.The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05).However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street (MC 898), Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The study evaluates the effectiveness of Compelled Body Weight Shift (CBWS) approach in the rehabilitation of individuals with stroke. CBWS involves a forced shift of body weight towards a person's affected side by means of a shoe insert that establishes a lift of the nonaffected lower extremity.

Methods: Eleven patients with acute stroke were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received a two-week conventional physical therapy combined with CBWS and the control group received only a two-week conventional therapy. Weight bearing, Gait velocity, Berg's Balance, and Fugl-Meyer's Scores were recorded before and after the intervention.

Results: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group. The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05). However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002). Berg Balance and Fugl-Meyer scores increased for both the groups.

Conclusion: The implementation of a two-week intervention with CBWS resulted in the improvement in weight bearing and gait velocity of individuals with acute stroke. The present preliminary study suggests that CBWS technique could be implemented as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation program for individuals with acute stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of a stroke-related asymmetry of stance and weight-bearing (left) and how a shoe insert restores weight-bearing symmetry by lifting the nonaffected lower extremity (right).
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Figure 1: Schematic representation of a stroke-related asymmetry of stance and weight-bearing (left) and how a shoe insert restores weight-bearing symmetry by lifting the nonaffected lower extremity (right).

Mentions: To achieve the compelled body weight shift, the individuals with hemiparesis included in the experimental group were provided with shoe lifts of 0.6 cm fabricated from medium hardness foam material made of ethylene vinyl acetate, while no shoe lift was provided to those included in the control group. Thus, each subject included in the experimental group wore shoes with the installed shoe lift (innersole) on the unaffected limb during the time of treatment (Figure 1). The subjects in both groups received similar physical therapy treatments, six times a week for two consecutive weeks. The duration of each treatment session was at least 90 minutes on weekdays and 30 minutes on Saturdays. Physical therapy interventions included (a) therapeutic exercises involving active and active-assisted range of motion training, (b) resistive exercises with Thera-Band and/or weights, (c) motor retraining activities such as static and dynamic standing and gait actions, (d) gait training involving walking over ground, on a treadmill, body weight support treadmill training, walking on indoor/outdoor surfaces, and stair training, and (f) functional performance training such as sit to stand maneuvers at varied heights and bed mobility exercises.


Compelled Body Weight Shift Technique to Facilitate Rehabilitation of Individuals with Acute Stroke.

Mohapatra S, Eviota AC, Ringquist KL, Muthukrishnan SR, Aruin AS - ISRN Rehabil (2012)

Schematic representation of a stroke-related asymmetry of stance and weight-bearing (left) and how a shoe insert restores weight-bearing symmetry by lifting the nonaffected lower extremity (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269244&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic representation of a stroke-related asymmetry of stance and weight-bearing (left) and how a shoe insert restores weight-bearing symmetry by lifting the nonaffected lower extremity (right).
Mentions: To achieve the compelled body weight shift, the individuals with hemiparesis included in the experimental group were provided with shoe lifts of 0.6 cm fabricated from medium hardness foam material made of ethylene vinyl acetate, while no shoe lift was provided to those included in the control group. Thus, each subject included in the experimental group wore shoes with the installed shoe lift (innersole) on the unaffected limb during the time of treatment (Figure 1). The subjects in both groups received similar physical therapy treatments, six times a week for two consecutive weeks. The duration of each treatment session was at least 90 minutes on weekdays and 30 minutes on Saturdays. Physical therapy interventions included (a) therapeutic exercises involving active and active-assisted range of motion training, (b) resistive exercises with Thera-Band and/or weights, (c) motor retraining activities such as static and dynamic standing and gait actions, (d) gait training involving walking over ground, on a treadmill, body weight support treadmill training, walking on indoor/outdoor surfaces, and stair training, and (f) functional performance training such as sit to stand maneuvers at varied heights and bed mobility exercises.

Bottom Line: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group.The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05).However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street (MC 898), Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: The study evaluates the effectiveness of Compelled Body Weight Shift (CBWS) approach in the rehabilitation of individuals with stroke. CBWS involves a forced shift of body weight towards a person's affected side by means of a shoe insert that establishes a lift of the nonaffected lower extremity.

Methods: Eleven patients with acute stroke were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received a two-week conventional physical therapy combined with CBWS and the control group received only a two-week conventional therapy. Weight bearing, Gait velocity, Berg's Balance, and Fugl-Meyer's Scores were recorded before and after the intervention.

Results: Weight bearing on the affected side increased in the experimental group and decreased in the control group. The increase in gait velocity with treatment was significant in both the groups (P < 0.05). However, experimental group (P = 0.01) demonstrated larger improvements in gait velocity compared to the control group (P = 0.002). Berg Balance and Fugl-Meyer scores increased for both the groups.

Conclusion: The implementation of a two-week intervention with CBWS resulted in the improvement in weight bearing and gait velocity of individuals with acute stroke. The present preliminary study suggests that CBWS technique could be implemented as an adjunct to conventional rehabilitation program for individuals with acute stroke.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus