Limits...
Ethnopharmacological assessment of medicinal plants used against livestock infections by the people living around Indus River.

Mussarat S, Amber R, Tariq A, Adnan M, AbdElsalam NM, Ullah R, Bibi R - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Total 43 plants belonging to 26 families were found to be used in ethnoveterinary practices.Preference ranking (PR) results showed that Zingiber officinale, Punica granatum, Triticum aestivum, Gossypium hirsutum, and Withania coagulans were the most preferred species for the treatment of diarrhea.Direct matrix ranking (DMR) results showed that Morus alba, Melia azedarach, Withania coagulans, Cassia fistula, Azadirachta indica, and Tamarix aphylla were the multipurpose species of the region.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat 26000, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
The present study was aimed to document detailed ethnopharmacological knowledge of medicinal plants against livestock infections of an unexplored remote region of Pakistan. Semistructured questionnaires were used for data collection. Total 43 plants belonging to 26 families were found to be used in ethnoveterinary practices. Seeds (29%) were found to be the most frequent plant part used followed by leaves (22%). Ethnoveterinary recipes were mostly prepared in the form of decoction and powdering. Informant consensus factor (Fic) results revealed high consensus for gastrointestinal (0.81), mastitis (0.82), and dermatological infections (0.80). Curcuma longa ranked first with highest fidelity level (FL) value (66%) followed by Trachyspermum ammi that ranked second (58%). Preference ranking (PR) results showed that Zingiber officinale, Punica granatum, Triticum aestivum, Gossypium hirsutum, and Withania coagulans were the most preferred species for the treatment of diarrhea. Direct matrix ranking (DMR) results showed that Morus alba, Melia azedarach, Withania coagulans, Cassia fistula, Azadirachta indica, and Tamarix aphylla were the multipurpose species of the region. We invite the attention of pharmacologists and chemists for further exploration of plants having high Fic, FL, and PR values in the present study. Conservation strategies should be adopted for the protection of multipurpose plant species.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of the study area.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269160&req=5

fig1: Map of the study area.

Mentions: The present study was carried out in the Dera Ismail Khan often abbreviated as D. I. Khan, a district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan (Figure 1). D. I. Khan covers an area of about 7326 km2 and is situated between 70°.11′ and 71°.20′ E longitude and between 31°.15′ and 32°.32′ N latitude [16]. D. I. Khan has mostly flat dry plains, commonly called Daman, about 80 percent of the total area [11]. Aquatic and xerophytic vegetations are commonly grown in the study area [17]. Acacia modesta, Calotropis procera, Acacia nilotica, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and Morus alba are the dominant vegetation of the study area. The maximum and minimum temperatures recorded during summer and winter are 27°C to 42°C and 20°C to 40°C, respectively [11]. Mostly rainfall occurs in the late winter and early spring while in monsoon in June and July. Wheat, rice, sugar cane, dates, and variety of mangoes are produced in D. I. Khan. Among these, “Village Dhakki date” is the most famous product, not only used in the country but also exported to the Middle East, Europe, and United States. The area is rural in nature and inhabitants are very much dependent on livestock for economic and food purposes. Locals of the region use variety of medicinal plants for the treatment of livestock ailments due to expensive veterinary drugs.


Ethnopharmacological assessment of medicinal plants used against livestock infections by the people living around Indus River.

Mussarat S, Amber R, Tariq A, Adnan M, AbdElsalam NM, Ullah R, Bibi R - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Map of the study area.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269160&req=5

fig1: Map of the study area.
Mentions: The present study was carried out in the Dera Ismail Khan often abbreviated as D. I. Khan, a district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan (Figure 1). D. I. Khan covers an area of about 7326 km2 and is situated between 70°.11′ and 71°.20′ E longitude and between 31°.15′ and 32°.32′ N latitude [16]. D. I. Khan has mostly flat dry plains, commonly called Daman, about 80 percent of the total area [11]. Aquatic and xerophytic vegetations are commonly grown in the study area [17]. Acacia modesta, Calotropis procera, Acacia nilotica, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and Morus alba are the dominant vegetation of the study area. The maximum and minimum temperatures recorded during summer and winter are 27°C to 42°C and 20°C to 40°C, respectively [11]. Mostly rainfall occurs in the late winter and early spring while in monsoon in June and July. Wheat, rice, sugar cane, dates, and variety of mangoes are produced in D. I. Khan. Among these, “Village Dhakki date” is the most famous product, not only used in the country but also exported to the Middle East, Europe, and United States. The area is rural in nature and inhabitants are very much dependent on livestock for economic and food purposes. Locals of the region use variety of medicinal plants for the treatment of livestock ailments due to expensive veterinary drugs.

Bottom Line: Total 43 plants belonging to 26 families were found to be used in ethnoveterinary practices.Preference ranking (PR) results showed that Zingiber officinale, Punica granatum, Triticum aestivum, Gossypium hirsutum, and Withania coagulans were the most preferred species for the treatment of diarrhea.Direct matrix ranking (DMR) results showed that Morus alba, Melia azedarach, Withania coagulans, Cassia fistula, Azadirachta indica, and Tamarix aphylla were the multipurpose species of the region.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat 26000, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT
The present study was aimed to document detailed ethnopharmacological knowledge of medicinal plants against livestock infections of an unexplored remote region of Pakistan. Semistructured questionnaires were used for data collection. Total 43 plants belonging to 26 families were found to be used in ethnoveterinary practices. Seeds (29%) were found to be the most frequent plant part used followed by leaves (22%). Ethnoveterinary recipes were mostly prepared in the form of decoction and powdering. Informant consensus factor (Fic) results revealed high consensus for gastrointestinal (0.81), mastitis (0.82), and dermatological infections (0.80). Curcuma longa ranked first with highest fidelity level (FL) value (66%) followed by Trachyspermum ammi that ranked second (58%). Preference ranking (PR) results showed that Zingiber officinale, Punica granatum, Triticum aestivum, Gossypium hirsutum, and Withania coagulans were the most preferred species for the treatment of diarrhea. Direct matrix ranking (DMR) results showed that Morus alba, Melia azedarach, Withania coagulans, Cassia fistula, Azadirachta indica, and Tamarix aphylla were the multipurpose species of the region. We invite the attention of pharmacologists and chemists for further exploration of plants having high Fic, FL, and PR values in the present study. Conservation strategies should be adopted for the protection of multipurpose plant species.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus