Limits...
Evaluation of a computational model to predict elbow range of motion.

Willing RT, Nishiwaki M, Johnson JA, King GJ, Athwal GS - Comput. Aided Surg. (2014)

Bottom Line: The model was validated against experimental results with a cadaveric specimen, and was able to predict the flexion and extension limits of the intact joint to 0° and 3°, respectively.The model was also able to predict the flexion and extension limits to 1° and 2°, respectively, when simulated osteophytes were inserted into the joint.Future studies based on this approach will be used for the prediction of elbow flexion-extension ROM in patients with primary osteoarthritis to help identify motion-limiting hypertrophic osteophytes, and will eventually permit real-time computer-assisted navigated excisions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bioengineering Research Laboratory, The Hand and Upper Limb Centre, Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph's Health Care London , London , Ontario .

ABSTRACT
Computer models capable of predicting elbow flexion and extension range of motion (ROM) limits would be useful for assisting surgeons in improving the outcomes of surgical treatment of patients with elbow contractures. A simple and robust computer-based model was developed that predicts elbow joint ROM using bone geometries calculated from computed tomography image data. The model assumes a hinge-like flexion-extension axis, and that elbow passive ROM limits can be based on terminal bony impingement. The model was validated against experimental results with a cadaveric specimen, and was able to predict the flexion and extension limits of the intact joint to 0° and 3°, respectively. The model was also able to predict the flexion and extension limits to 1° and 2°, respectively, when simulated osteophytes were inserted into the joint. Future studies based on this approach will be used for the prediction of elbow flexion-extension ROM in patients with primary osteoarthritis to help identify motion-limiting hypertrophic osteophytes, and will eventually permit real-time computer-assisted navigated excisions.

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Deviation of the center of a circle fitted to the greater sigmoid notch of the ulna (GSN) from the flexion-extension (FE) axis defined by the center of a circle fitted to the trochlea and a sphere fitted to the capitellum of the distal humerus. Larger deviations indicate that the ulnohumeral joint is undergoing non-physiologic subluxation. Shaded regions indicate the mean ±1 standard deviation of the corresponding data gathered during all trials.
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f3: Deviation of the center of a circle fitted to the greater sigmoid notch of the ulna (GSN) from the flexion-extension (FE) axis defined by the center of a circle fitted to the trochlea and a sphere fitted to the capitellum of the distal humerus. Larger deviations indicate that the ulnohumeral joint is undergoing non-physiologic subluxation. Shaded regions indicate the mean ±1 standard deviation of the corresponding data gathered during all trials.

Mentions: During the 5 flexion and extension motions with the intact joint, the average (±1 standard deviation) range of motion before bony impingement occurred was 0 ± 1° in extension and 158 ± 1° in flexion. Deviation of the GSN from the FE axis was typically less than 2 mm (Figure 3), indicating that the joint maintained congruency throughout the arc of motion.Figure 3.


Evaluation of a computational model to predict elbow range of motion.

Willing RT, Nishiwaki M, Johnson JA, King GJ, Athwal GS - Comput. Aided Surg. (2014)

Deviation of the center of a circle fitted to the greater sigmoid notch of the ulna (GSN) from the flexion-extension (FE) axis defined by the center of a circle fitted to the trochlea and a sphere fitted to the capitellum of the distal humerus. Larger deviations indicate that the ulnohumeral joint is undergoing non-physiologic subluxation. Shaded regions indicate the mean ±1 standard deviation of the corresponding data gathered during all trials.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269151&req=5

f3: Deviation of the center of a circle fitted to the greater sigmoid notch of the ulna (GSN) from the flexion-extension (FE) axis defined by the center of a circle fitted to the trochlea and a sphere fitted to the capitellum of the distal humerus. Larger deviations indicate that the ulnohumeral joint is undergoing non-physiologic subluxation. Shaded regions indicate the mean ±1 standard deviation of the corresponding data gathered during all trials.
Mentions: During the 5 flexion and extension motions with the intact joint, the average (±1 standard deviation) range of motion before bony impingement occurred was 0 ± 1° in extension and 158 ± 1° in flexion. Deviation of the GSN from the FE axis was typically less than 2 mm (Figure 3), indicating that the joint maintained congruency throughout the arc of motion.Figure 3.

Bottom Line: The model was validated against experimental results with a cadaveric specimen, and was able to predict the flexion and extension limits of the intact joint to 0° and 3°, respectively.The model was also able to predict the flexion and extension limits to 1° and 2°, respectively, when simulated osteophytes were inserted into the joint.Future studies based on this approach will be used for the prediction of elbow flexion-extension ROM in patients with primary osteoarthritis to help identify motion-limiting hypertrophic osteophytes, and will eventually permit real-time computer-assisted navigated excisions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bioengineering Research Laboratory, The Hand and Upper Limb Centre, Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph's Health Care London , London , Ontario .

ABSTRACT
Computer models capable of predicting elbow flexion and extension range of motion (ROM) limits would be useful for assisting surgeons in improving the outcomes of surgical treatment of patients with elbow contractures. A simple and robust computer-based model was developed that predicts elbow joint ROM using bone geometries calculated from computed tomography image data. The model assumes a hinge-like flexion-extension axis, and that elbow passive ROM limits can be based on terminal bony impingement. The model was validated against experimental results with a cadaveric specimen, and was able to predict the flexion and extension limits of the intact joint to 0° and 3°, respectively. The model was also able to predict the flexion and extension limits to 1° and 2°, respectively, when simulated osteophytes were inserted into the joint. Future studies based on this approach will be used for the prediction of elbow flexion-extension ROM in patients with primary osteoarthritis to help identify motion-limiting hypertrophic osteophytes, and will eventually permit real-time computer-assisted navigated excisions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus