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Risk factors associated with serum levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in a general population.

Haupt TH, Kallemose T, Ladelund S, Rasmussen LJ, Thorball CW, Andersen O, Pisinger C, Eugen-Olsen J - Biomark Insights (2014)

Bottom Line: An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels.In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population.Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Research Centre, Department 056, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effects of the indicated factors on serum suPAR levels compared to the reference point of the Combined model. Dots represent the estimate, and lines represent the 95% CIs. If a factor is listed twice, it indicates a sex interaction, and both the female (F) and male (M) estimates are shown.
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f2-bmi-9-2014-091: The effects of the indicated factors on serum suPAR levels compared to the reference point of the Combined model. Dots represent the estimate, and lines represent the 95% CIs. If a factor is listed twice, it indicates a sex interaction, and both the female (F) and male (M) estimates are shown.

Mentions: Effect sizes for the Combined model are illustrated in Figure 2. Given that the reference point was 2.49 ng/mL for men and 3.01 ng/mL for women, most of the investigated factors had a modest influence on suPAR levels (less than 0.5 ng/mL). However, daily heavy smoking and class III/morbid obesity (BMI ≥40 kg/m2) were associated with a ≥1 ng/mL increase in the suPAR level. Age, total cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol are continuous measures, but the scales are rather restricted, which limits the effect size. The R2 was 0.22 for the Combined model for both men and women.


Risk factors associated with serum levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in a general population.

Haupt TH, Kallemose T, Ladelund S, Rasmussen LJ, Thorball CW, Andersen O, Pisinger C, Eugen-Olsen J - Biomark Insights (2014)

The effects of the indicated factors on serum suPAR levels compared to the reference point of the Combined model. Dots represent the estimate, and lines represent the 95% CIs. If a factor is listed twice, it indicates a sex interaction, and both the female (F) and male (M) estimates are shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4269129&req=5

f2-bmi-9-2014-091: The effects of the indicated factors on serum suPAR levels compared to the reference point of the Combined model. Dots represent the estimate, and lines represent the 95% CIs. If a factor is listed twice, it indicates a sex interaction, and both the female (F) and male (M) estimates are shown.
Mentions: Effect sizes for the Combined model are illustrated in Figure 2. Given that the reference point was 2.49 ng/mL for men and 3.01 ng/mL for women, most of the investigated factors had a modest influence on suPAR levels (less than 0.5 ng/mL). However, daily heavy smoking and class III/morbid obesity (BMI ≥40 kg/m2) were associated with a ≥1 ng/mL increase in the suPAR level. Age, total cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol are continuous measures, but the scales are rather restricted, which limits the effect size. The R2 was 0.22 for the Combined model for both men and women.

Bottom Line: An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels.In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population.Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Research Centre, Department 056, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus