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Evaluation of the Back College for nursing staff.

Koch P, Pietsch A, Harling M, Behl-Schön S, Nienhaus A - J Occup Med Toxicol (2014)

Bottom Line: Statistically significant reductions in pain were found for the whole group and for all subgroups.For persons who predominantly worked in old people's homes and who did not take part in refresher services, an increased odds ratio was found for unfavourable changes in pain (OR: 1.9 or 1.4, respectively).An increased risk of leaving was also found for persons who did not take part in workplace support (OR: 2.9).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Epidemiology and Health Services Research for Healthcare Professionals (CVcare), University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, Hamburg, 20246, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Work-related musculoskeletal pain- particularly back pain - is an important individual and socioeconomic problem. The Back College for the insurance holders of the Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services (BGW) is based on a multimodal concept and has been evaluated with respect to pain relief and continuing in the nursing profession.

Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the participants in the Back College from 2009 to 2011 were surveyed in writing. Besides demographic data, the survey covered information on qualification, length of employment, institution, employment status, periods of inability to work, applicability of working techniques and continuation in the profession. Back pain was recorded at three time points - T1 (before the Back College), T2 (directly after the Back College) and T3 (at the time of the survey). Pain changes were submitted to tests for paired samples. Multivariate logistic analysis was applied to determine potential factors influencing unfavourable changes in pain or leaving nursing due to back pain.

Results: The survey covered 1,282 insurance holders, with a response rate of 80%. Statistically significant reductions in pain were found for the whole group and for all subgroups. For persons who predominantly worked in old people's homes and who did not take part in refresher services, an increased odds ratio was found for unfavourable changes in pain (OR: 1.9 or 1.4, respectively). Persons with a qualification in geriatric nursing or in intensive care/OP/anaesthesia had an increased risk of leaving nursing due to back pain (OR: 2.5 in each case). An increased risk of leaving was also found for persons who did not take part in workplace support (OR: 2.9).

Conclusion: Within the context of the study design, the multimodal concept of the Back College is clearly related to relief of back pain. The Back College appears to be less successful for geriatric nurses and persons with qualifications in intensive care/OP/anaesthesia. Further studies are needed to ascertain why some participants experience less relief in stress from the working techniques they have learnt.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of pain at time points T1, T2, T3.
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Figure 2: Distribution of pain at time points T1, T2, T3.

Mentions: Pain was compared at T2 - directly after the Back College (median = 3) - with T1 - before the Back College (median = 6). There was a marked decrease in pain for the whole group (Figure 2). At the time of the survey (T3), pain had slightly risen again. The median was then 4, which is still better than the value at T1. Relative to the time since the Back College, identical medians were found for all three years at T1, T2 and T3 (Figure 3). Thus, there was no time-dependent increase in the pain level at T3 (the time of the survey) for 2009 and 2010.


Evaluation of the Back College for nursing staff.

Koch P, Pietsch A, Harling M, Behl-Schön S, Nienhaus A - J Occup Med Toxicol (2014)

Distribution of pain at time points T1, T2, T3.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265890&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of pain at time points T1, T2, T3.
Mentions: Pain was compared at T2 - directly after the Back College (median = 3) - with T1 - before the Back College (median = 6). There was a marked decrease in pain for the whole group (Figure 2). At the time of the survey (T3), pain had slightly risen again. The median was then 4, which is still better than the value at T1. Relative to the time since the Back College, identical medians were found for all three years at T1, T2 and T3 (Figure 3). Thus, there was no time-dependent increase in the pain level at T3 (the time of the survey) for 2009 and 2010.

Bottom Line: Statistically significant reductions in pain were found for the whole group and for all subgroups.For persons who predominantly worked in old people's homes and who did not take part in refresher services, an increased odds ratio was found for unfavourable changes in pain (OR: 1.9 or 1.4, respectively).An increased risk of leaving was also found for persons who did not take part in workplace support (OR: 2.9).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Epidemiology and Health Services Research for Healthcare Professionals (CVcare), University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, Hamburg, 20246, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Work-related musculoskeletal pain- particularly back pain - is an important individual and socioeconomic problem. The Back College for the insurance holders of the Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services (BGW) is based on a multimodal concept and has been evaluated with respect to pain relief and continuing in the nursing profession.

Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the participants in the Back College from 2009 to 2011 were surveyed in writing. Besides demographic data, the survey covered information on qualification, length of employment, institution, employment status, periods of inability to work, applicability of working techniques and continuation in the profession. Back pain was recorded at three time points - T1 (before the Back College), T2 (directly after the Back College) and T3 (at the time of the survey). Pain changes were submitted to tests for paired samples. Multivariate logistic analysis was applied to determine potential factors influencing unfavourable changes in pain or leaving nursing due to back pain.

Results: The survey covered 1,282 insurance holders, with a response rate of 80%. Statistically significant reductions in pain were found for the whole group and for all subgroups. For persons who predominantly worked in old people's homes and who did not take part in refresher services, an increased odds ratio was found for unfavourable changes in pain (OR: 1.9 or 1.4, respectively). Persons with a qualification in geriatric nursing or in intensive care/OP/anaesthesia had an increased risk of leaving nursing due to back pain (OR: 2.5 in each case). An increased risk of leaving was also found for persons who did not take part in workplace support (OR: 2.9).

Conclusion: Within the context of the study design, the multimodal concept of the Back College is clearly related to relief of back pain. The Back College appears to be less successful for geriatric nurses and persons with qualifications in intensive care/OP/anaesthesia. Further studies are needed to ascertain why some participants experience less relief in stress from the working techniques they have learnt.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus