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Incentivizing monitoring and compliance in trophy hunting.

Bunnefeld N, Edwards CT, Atickem A, Hailu F, Milner-Gulland EJ - Conserv. Biol. (2013)

Bottom Line: Harvest strategy was robust to the uncertainty in the population estimates obtained from monitoring, but poaching had a much stronger effect on quota and sustainability.Hence, reducing poaching is in the interests of companies wishing to increase the profitability of their enterprises, for example by engaging community members as game scouts.Our results illustrate the importance of considering the incentives of multiple stakeholders when designing frameworks for resource use and when designing management frameworks to address the particular sources of uncertainty that affect system sustainability most heavily.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL5 7PY, United Kingdom; School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom. nils.bunnefeld@stir.ac.uk.

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Effect of poaching of mountain nyala (percent offtake of the male population >5 years of age) on (a) average annual variation in quota, (b) quota size, (c) population size, and (d) the coefficient of variation of population size. Results from scenarios of adaptive, proportional, and constant harvesting are shown.
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fig05: Effect of poaching of mountain nyala (percent offtake of the male population >5 years of age) on (a) average annual variation in quota, (b) quota size, (c) population size, and (d) the coefficient of variation of population size. Results from scenarios of adaptive, proportional, and constant harvesting are shown.

Mentions: At low poaching levels (1%), the adaptive strategy lowered the quota AAV by up to 5 nyala/year (Fig.5a) but returned a quota size that was about 10 nyala lower compared with proportional hunting (Fig.5b). The population size was similar among the adaptive, proportional, and constant strategies (Fig.5c). At high levels of poaching (10%), the population went nearly extinct for all 3 strategies. The CV in population size was generally stable for all 3 strategies, but it increased due to low population size at high poaching rates (Fig.5d).


Incentivizing monitoring and compliance in trophy hunting.

Bunnefeld N, Edwards CT, Atickem A, Hailu F, Milner-Gulland EJ - Conserv. Biol. (2013)

Effect of poaching of mountain nyala (percent offtake of the male population >5 years of age) on (a) average annual variation in quota, (b) quota size, (c) population size, and (d) the coefficient of variation of population size. Results from scenarios of adaptive, proportional, and constant harvesting are shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265855&req=5

fig05: Effect of poaching of mountain nyala (percent offtake of the male population >5 years of age) on (a) average annual variation in quota, (b) quota size, (c) population size, and (d) the coefficient of variation of population size. Results from scenarios of adaptive, proportional, and constant harvesting are shown.
Mentions: At low poaching levels (1%), the adaptive strategy lowered the quota AAV by up to 5 nyala/year (Fig.5a) but returned a quota size that was about 10 nyala lower compared with proportional hunting (Fig.5b). The population size was similar among the adaptive, proportional, and constant strategies (Fig.5c). At high levels of poaching (10%), the population went nearly extinct for all 3 strategies. The CV in population size was generally stable for all 3 strategies, but it increased due to low population size at high poaching rates (Fig.5d).

Bottom Line: Harvest strategy was robust to the uncertainty in the population estimates obtained from monitoring, but poaching had a much stronger effect on quota and sustainability.Hence, reducing poaching is in the interests of companies wishing to increase the profitability of their enterprises, for example by engaging community members as game scouts.Our results illustrate the importance of considering the incentives of multiple stakeholders when designing frameworks for resource use and when designing management frameworks to address the particular sources of uncertainty that affect system sustainability most heavily.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL5 7PY, United Kingdom; School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom. nils.bunnefeld@stir.ac.uk.

Show MeSH