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The double loop mattress suture.

Biddlestone J, Samuel M, Creagh T, Ahmad T - Wound Repair Regen (2014)

Bottom Line: Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001).Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro.Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CRUK Clinical Research Fellow, Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom; Honorary Speciality Registrar, Department for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom.

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(A) In vitro experimental chamber: The chamber (C) is constructed from stainless steel and is mounted on a vibration-isolating platform. Two Load cells are positioned on perpendicular axes (A). Force is generated by activation of the stepper motors (B). Pregassed and warmed Krebs–Henseleit ringer is pumped into the chamber from a water bath (not shown) and circulates in the direction of the black arrows. The temperature of the chamber is constantly monitored by the retractable probe (T).(B) Mounted tissue. Upper three panels left to right: Cartilage samples are mounted in the chamber using steel clamps (D) and stress pins (E) in the orientation of axis I (white arrow). Reference points are marked onto the cartilage to allow displacement to be measured (F). The synchronizing light emitting diode is removed once triggered. Lower three panels left to right: Muscle samples are mounted in the chamber in a similar manner to cartilage samples. The joined tendon is in view (G). A sizing pin of known diameter is used as a reference point (H).
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fig02: (A) In vitro experimental chamber: The chamber (C) is constructed from stainless steel and is mounted on a vibration-isolating platform. Two Load cells are positioned on perpendicular axes (A). Force is generated by activation of the stepper motors (B). Pregassed and warmed Krebs–Henseleit ringer is pumped into the chamber from a water bath (not shown) and circulates in the direction of the black arrows. The temperature of the chamber is constantly monitored by the retractable probe (T).(B) Mounted tissue. Upper three panels left to right: Cartilage samples are mounted in the chamber using steel clamps (D) and stress pins (E) in the orientation of axis I (white arrow). Reference points are marked onto the cartilage to allow displacement to be measured (F). The synchronizing light emitting diode is removed once triggered. Lower three panels left to right: Muscle samples are mounted in the chamber in a similar manner to cartilage samples. The joined tendon is in view (G). A sizing pin of known diameter is used as a reference point (H).

Mentions: A bespoke physiological experimental chamber was constructed from stainless steel (Figure 2A) (University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge, United Kingdom). The chamber was temperature controlled (Labfacility, Sheffield, United Kingdom; XF-315-FAR) and designed to maintain samples in gassed KHR (95% O2, 5% CO2) at 37 °C throughout the test period. Stepper motors were used to apply a uniformly incremental distracting force (0.5 mm/s) in to all samples. Multiple load cells were positioned to record real-time measurements of force (Tedea-Huntleigh Model 1022; InterTechnology Inc. Toronto, Canada;). The charge coupled device (CCD) recorded images of sample displacement that were synchronized with the load cell measurements using a light emitting diode (LED) trigger. All components were controlled, and data acquisition was performed using an implementation of LabVIEW software (National Instruments, Berkshire, United Kingdom).


The double loop mattress suture.

Biddlestone J, Samuel M, Creagh T, Ahmad T - Wound Repair Regen (2014)

(A) In vitro experimental chamber: The chamber (C) is constructed from stainless steel and is mounted on a vibration-isolating platform. Two Load cells are positioned on perpendicular axes (A). Force is generated by activation of the stepper motors (B). Pregassed and warmed Krebs–Henseleit ringer is pumped into the chamber from a water bath (not shown) and circulates in the direction of the black arrows. The temperature of the chamber is constantly monitored by the retractable probe (T).(B) Mounted tissue. Upper three panels left to right: Cartilage samples are mounted in the chamber using steel clamps (D) and stress pins (E) in the orientation of axis I (white arrow). Reference points are marked onto the cartilage to allow displacement to be measured (F). The synchronizing light emitting diode is removed once triggered. Lower three panels left to right: Muscle samples are mounted in the chamber in a similar manner to cartilage samples. The joined tendon is in view (G). A sizing pin of known diameter is used as a reference point (H).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265851&req=5

fig02: (A) In vitro experimental chamber: The chamber (C) is constructed from stainless steel and is mounted on a vibration-isolating platform. Two Load cells are positioned on perpendicular axes (A). Force is generated by activation of the stepper motors (B). Pregassed and warmed Krebs–Henseleit ringer is pumped into the chamber from a water bath (not shown) and circulates in the direction of the black arrows. The temperature of the chamber is constantly monitored by the retractable probe (T).(B) Mounted tissue. Upper three panels left to right: Cartilage samples are mounted in the chamber using steel clamps (D) and stress pins (E) in the orientation of axis I (white arrow). Reference points are marked onto the cartilage to allow displacement to be measured (F). The synchronizing light emitting diode is removed once triggered. Lower three panels left to right: Muscle samples are mounted in the chamber in a similar manner to cartilage samples. The joined tendon is in view (G). A sizing pin of known diameter is used as a reference point (H).
Mentions: A bespoke physiological experimental chamber was constructed from stainless steel (Figure 2A) (University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge, United Kingdom). The chamber was temperature controlled (Labfacility, Sheffield, United Kingdom; XF-315-FAR) and designed to maintain samples in gassed KHR (95% O2, 5% CO2) at 37 °C throughout the test period. Stepper motors were used to apply a uniformly incremental distracting force (0.5 mm/s) in to all samples. Multiple load cells were positioned to record real-time measurements of force (Tedea-Huntleigh Model 1022; InterTechnology Inc. Toronto, Canada;). The charge coupled device (CCD) recorded images of sample displacement that were synchronized with the load cell measurements using a light emitting diode (LED) trigger. All components were controlled, and data acquisition was performed using an implementation of LabVIEW software (National Instruments, Berkshire, United Kingdom).

Bottom Line: Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001).Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro.Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CRUK Clinical Research Fellow, Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom; Honorary Speciality Registrar, Department for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus