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Differing associations of BMI and body fat with asthma and lung function in children.

Wang R, Custovic A, Simpson A, Belgrave DC, Lowe LA, Murray CS - Pediatr. Pulmonol. (2013)

Bottom Line: Higher BMI was significantly associated with an increase in FEV(1) and FVC, but only in girls.Conversely, increasing body fat (PBF and PTF) was associated with reduced FEV(1) and FVC, but only in boys.However, BMI and PBF did not have the same effects and girls and boys appear to be affected differently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, University Hospital of South Manchester, NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consort diagram of data collected at age 11 follow-up visit.
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fig01: Consort diagram of data collected at age 11 follow-up visit.

Mentions: Data were collected on 930 individuals at the age 11-year review; 104 children prenatally randomized to an environmental intervention20 were excluded from this analysis. Of 826 children in the observational cohort, 653 attended the hospital review and had body fat assessed using BIA (92 completed postal questionnaires, 81 home visits); 646 successfully completed BIA measurement (Fig. 1). There was no significant difference in asthma, BMI, ethnicity, socio-economic status, birth weight, gestational age, and parental atopy between children included and not included in the analysis. Demographics of the study population are shown in Table1. There were clear differences between boys and girls in the prevalence of asthma and atopy and also in measures of body fat; subsequent analysis was therefore also conducted in boys and girls separately.


Differing associations of BMI and body fat with asthma and lung function in children.

Wang R, Custovic A, Simpson A, Belgrave DC, Lowe LA, Murray CS - Pediatr. Pulmonol. (2013)

Consort diagram of data collected at age 11 follow-up visit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265846&req=5

fig01: Consort diagram of data collected at age 11 follow-up visit.
Mentions: Data were collected on 930 individuals at the age 11-year review; 104 children prenatally randomized to an environmental intervention20 were excluded from this analysis. Of 826 children in the observational cohort, 653 attended the hospital review and had body fat assessed using BIA (92 completed postal questionnaires, 81 home visits); 646 successfully completed BIA measurement (Fig. 1). There was no significant difference in asthma, BMI, ethnicity, socio-economic status, birth weight, gestational age, and parental atopy between children included and not included in the analysis. Demographics of the study population are shown in Table1. There were clear differences between boys and girls in the prevalence of asthma and atopy and also in measures of body fat; subsequent analysis was therefore also conducted in boys and girls separately.

Bottom Line: Higher BMI was significantly associated with an increase in FEV(1) and FVC, but only in girls.Conversely, increasing body fat (PBF and PTF) was associated with reduced FEV(1) and FVC, but only in boys.However, BMI and PBF did not have the same effects and girls and boys appear to be affected differently.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, University Hospital of South Manchester, NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus