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Neuropeptides in the antennal lobe of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

Siju KP, Reifenrath A, Scheiblich H, Neupert S, Predel R, Hansson BS, Schachtner J, Ignell R - J. Comp. Neurol. (2014)

Bottom Line: The most diverse and versatile neurochemicals in the insect nervous system are found in the neuropeptides.Allatostatin A, allatotropin, SIFamide, FMRFamide-related peptides, short neuropeptide F, myoinhibitory peptide, and tachykinin-related peptides were found to be expressed in local interneurons and extrinsic neurons of the antennal lobe.Building on these results, we discuss the possible role of neuropeptide signaling in the antennal lobe of Ae. aegypti.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Chemical Ecology, Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 230 53, Alnarp, Sweden.

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Confocal images of a female Ae. aegypti AL labeled with antisera against AST-A (green) and synapsin (magenta). All frontal views. A: Maximum projection of 27 optical sections showing the middle to posterior portion of the ALs and the anterior part of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG). Two large cell bodies (arrow) in the SOG send their neurites into the ipsilateral AL, which give rise to thick fibers and varicosities (small arrows) in the center neuropil of the AL. From there, a sparse fiber network invests the glomerular neuropil. Note that the thick fibers never enter the glomeruli but stay outside between them (see also D,G). The neurites extending from the cell bodies indicated by asterisks bypass the ALs. B–D: Maximum projections of two optical sections in the anterior portion of the AL. A group of 12 to 16 cell bodies in the lateral cell group (asterisk) project their neurites into the AL neuropil. The ventral and anteromedial glomeruli show innervations with immunopositive fibers, whereas other glomeruli show little or no immunostaining. Arrows label thick AST-A-immunoreactive varicosities stemming from the posterior meshwork. E–G: A single optical section through the anterior part of the AL shows the ventral and anteromedial glomeruli with AST-A immunostaining. The arrow marks a thick fiber running between two glomeruli. AMMC: antennal motor and mechanosensory center. Scale bars = 20 μm.
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fig02: Confocal images of a female Ae. aegypti AL labeled with antisera against AST-A (green) and synapsin (magenta). All frontal views. A: Maximum projection of 27 optical sections showing the middle to posterior portion of the ALs and the anterior part of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG). Two large cell bodies (arrow) in the SOG send their neurites into the ipsilateral AL, which give rise to thick fibers and varicosities (small arrows) in the center neuropil of the AL. From there, a sparse fiber network invests the glomerular neuropil. Note that the thick fibers never enter the glomeruli but stay outside between them (see also D,G). The neurites extending from the cell bodies indicated by asterisks bypass the ALs. B–D: Maximum projections of two optical sections in the anterior portion of the AL. A group of 12 to 16 cell bodies in the lateral cell group (asterisk) project their neurites into the AL neuropil. The ventral and anteromedial glomeruli show innervations with immunopositive fibers, whereas other glomeruli show little or no immunostaining. Arrows label thick AST-A-immunoreactive varicosities stemming from the posterior meshwork. E–G: A single optical section through the anterior part of the AL shows the ventral and anteromedial glomeruli with AST-A immunostaining. The arrow marks a thick fiber running between two glomeruli. AMMC: antennal motor and mechanosensory center. Scale bars = 20 μm.

Mentions: Immunolabeling with AST-A antiserum was observed in 12–16 local interneurons (LNs), with cell bodies located lateral to the AL (Fig. 2B). The LNs innervated the ventral (V1 and V3; nomenclature according to Ignell et al., 2005) and anteromedial glomeruli (AM1–AM5) with thin branches, whereas other glomeruli appeared to receive little or no innervation (Fig. 2B–G). Moreover, we observed an extrinsic neuron innervating each AL. The cell bodies of these neurons were located ipsilaterally in the anterior part of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG) (Fig. 2A, arrow). These neurons innervated the ALs with sparse arborization of fibers with large varicosities (Fig. 2) restricted to the Johnston’s organ center (Fig. 2A), and the mediodorsal glomeruli innervated by maxillary palp OSNs (data not shown). We observed a process of this neuron extending outside the AL but were not able to trace the projection of it.


Neuropeptides in the antennal lobe of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

Siju KP, Reifenrath A, Scheiblich H, Neupert S, Predel R, Hansson BS, Schachtner J, Ignell R - J. Comp. Neurol. (2014)

Confocal images of a female Ae. aegypti AL labeled with antisera against AST-A (green) and synapsin (magenta). All frontal views. A: Maximum projection of 27 optical sections showing the middle to posterior portion of the ALs and the anterior part of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG). Two large cell bodies (arrow) in the SOG send their neurites into the ipsilateral AL, which give rise to thick fibers and varicosities (small arrows) in the center neuropil of the AL. From there, a sparse fiber network invests the glomerular neuropil. Note that the thick fibers never enter the glomeruli but stay outside between them (see also D,G). The neurites extending from the cell bodies indicated by asterisks bypass the ALs. B–D: Maximum projections of two optical sections in the anterior portion of the AL. A group of 12 to 16 cell bodies in the lateral cell group (asterisk) project their neurites into the AL neuropil. The ventral and anteromedial glomeruli show innervations with immunopositive fibers, whereas other glomeruli show little or no immunostaining. Arrows label thick AST-A-immunoreactive varicosities stemming from the posterior meshwork. E–G: A single optical section through the anterior part of the AL shows the ventral and anteromedial glomeruli with AST-A immunostaining. The arrow marks a thick fiber running between two glomeruli. AMMC: antennal motor and mechanosensory center. Scale bars = 20 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265797&req=5

fig02: Confocal images of a female Ae. aegypti AL labeled with antisera against AST-A (green) and synapsin (magenta). All frontal views. A: Maximum projection of 27 optical sections showing the middle to posterior portion of the ALs and the anterior part of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG). Two large cell bodies (arrow) in the SOG send their neurites into the ipsilateral AL, which give rise to thick fibers and varicosities (small arrows) in the center neuropil of the AL. From there, a sparse fiber network invests the glomerular neuropil. Note that the thick fibers never enter the glomeruli but stay outside between them (see also D,G). The neurites extending from the cell bodies indicated by asterisks bypass the ALs. B–D: Maximum projections of two optical sections in the anterior portion of the AL. A group of 12 to 16 cell bodies in the lateral cell group (asterisk) project their neurites into the AL neuropil. The ventral and anteromedial glomeruli show innervations with immunopositive fibers, whereas other glomeruli show little or no immunostaining. Arrows label thick AST-A-immunoreactive varicosities stemming from the posterior meshwork. E–G: A single optical section through the anterior part of the AL shows the ventral and anteromedial glomeruli with AST-A immunostaining. The arrow marks a thick fiber running between two glomeruli. AMMC: antennal motor and mechanosensory center. Scale bars = 20 μm.
Mentions: Immunolabeling with AST-A antiserum was observed in 12–16 local interneurons (LNs), with cell bodies located lateral to the AL (Fig. 2B). The LNs innervated the ventral (V1 and V3; nomenclature according to Ignell et al., 2005) and anteromedial glomeruli (AM1–AM5) with thin branches, whereas other glomeruli appeared to receive little or no innervation (Fig. 2B–G). Moreover, we observed an extrinsic neuron innervating each AL. The cell bodies of these neurons were located ipsilaterally in the anterior part of the subesophageal ganglion (SOG) (Fig. 2A, arrow). These neurons innervated the ALs with sparse arborization of fibers with large varicosities (Fig. 2) restricted to the Johnston’s organ center (Fig. 2A), and the mediodorsal glomeruli innervated by maxillary palp OSNs (data not shown). We observed a process of this neuron extending outside the AL but were not able to trace the projection of it.

Bottom Line: The most diverse and versatile neurochemicals in the insect nervous system are found in the neuropeptides.Allatostatin A, allatotropin, SIFamide, FMRFamide-related peptides, short neuropeptide F, myoinhibitory peptide, and tachykinin-related peptides were found to be expressed in local interneurons and extrinsic neurons of the antennal lobe.Building on these results, we discuss the possible role of neuropeptide signaling in the antennal lobe of Ae. aegypti.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Chemical Ecology, Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 230 53, Alnarp, Sweden.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus