Limits...
How is water-use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems distributed and changing on Earth?

Tang X, Li H, Desai AR, Nagy Z, Luo J, Kolb TE, Olioso A, Xu X, Yao L, Kutsch W, Pilegaard K, Köstner B, Ammann C - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: One peak is located at 20° ~ 30°N and the other extends a little farther north than 51°N.Finally, long-term spatiotemporal trend analysis using satellite-based remote sensing data reveals that land-cover and land-use change in recent years has led to a decline in global WUE.Our study provides a new framework for global research on the interactions between carbon and water cycles as well as responses to natural and human impacts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.

ABSTRACT
A better understanding of ecosystem water-use efficiency (WUE) will help us improve ecosystem management for mitigation as well as adaption to global hydrological change. Here, long-term flux tower observations of productivity and evapotranspiration allow us to detect a consistent latitudinal trend in WUE, rising from the subtropics to the northern high-latitudes. The trend peaks at approximately 51°N, and then declines toward higher latitudes. These ground-based observations are consistent with global-scale estimates of WUE. Global analysis of WUE reveals existence of strong regional variations that correspond to global climate patterns. The latitudinal trends of global WUE for Earth's major plant functional types reveal two peaks in the Northern Hemisphere not detected by ground-based measurements. One peak is located at 20° ~ 30°N and the other extends a little farther north than 51°N. Finally, long-term spatiotemporal trend analysis using satellite-based remote sensing data reveals that land-cover and land-use change in recent years has led to a decline in global WUE. Our study provides a new framework for global research on the interactions between carbon and water cycles as well as responses to natural and human impacts.

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Seasonal dynamics of terrestrial water use efficiency of the FLUXNET sites used in Table 1 according to the plant functional types at 8-day time scale.These EC sites were listed briefly in Table 1. (a) broad-leaved evergreen forest; (b) needleleaf evergreen forest; (c) mixed forest; (d) broad-leaved deciduous forest; (e) grassland and (f) cropland. This figure was produced using Origin 8.0.
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f7: Seasonal dynamics of terrestrial water use efficiency of the FLUXNET sites used in Table 1 according to the plant functional types at 8-day time scale.These EC sites were listed briefly in Table 1. (a) broad-leaved evergreen forest; (b) needleleaf evergreen forest; (c) mixed forest; (d) broad-leaved deciduous forest; (e) grassland and (f) cropland. This figure was produced using Origin 8.0.

Mentions: The seasonal pattern of WUE by site reveals how mechanisms that lead to long-term annual WUE vary by plant functional type (Fig. 7). WUE was higher at the beginning and end of the year, and lowest in summer in broad-leaved evergreen forest except for an Italian Mediterranean site (IT-Cpz) where the relatively low temperature during winter months hindered the growth of vegetation. Similarly, needleleaf evergreen forest showed significant peaks during early growing season (spring) and late growing season (late summer). In contrast, a consistent tendency was found in both mixed forest and broad-leaf deciduous forest of a singe WUE peak in summertime. The seasonal dynamics in WUE of grassland lacked consistent patterns owing to the broadly-distributed location of grasslands among various climate patterns and both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Crop WUE is likely also sensitive to the variety of farming systems.


How is water-use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems distributed and changing on Earth?

Tang X, Li H, Desai AR, Nagy Z, Luo J, Kolb TE, Olioso A, Xu X, Yao L, Kutsch W, Pilegaard K, Köstner B, Ammann C - Sci Rep (2014)

Seasonal dynamics of terrestrial water use efficiency of the FLUXNET sites used in Table 1 according to the plant functional types at 8-day time scale.These EC sites were listed briefly in Table 1. (a) broad-leaved evergreen forest; (b) needleleaf evergreen forest; (c) mixed forest; (d) broad-leaved deciduous forest; (e) grassland and (f) cropland. This figure was produced using Origin 8.0.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265788&req=5

f7: Seasonal dynamics of terrestrial water use efficiency of the FLUXNET sites used in Table 1 according to the plant functional types at 8-day time scale.These EC sites were listed briefly in Table 1. (a) broad-leaved evergreen forest; (b) needleleaf evergreen forest; (c) mixed forest; (d) broad-leaved deciduous forest; (e) grassland and (f) cropland. This figure was produced using Origin 8.0.
Mentions: The seasonal pattern of WUE by site reveals how mechanisms that lead to long-term annual WUE vary by plant functional type (Fig. 7). WUE was higher at the beginning and end of the year, and lowest in summer in broad-leaved evergreen forest except for an Italian Mediterranean site (IT-Cpz) where the relatively low temperature during winter months hindered the growth of vegetation. Similarly, needleleaf evergreen forest showed significant peaks during early growing season (spring) and late growing season (late summer). In contrast, a consistent tendency was found in both mixed forest and broad-leaf deciduous forest of a singe WUE peak in summertime. The seasonal dynamics in WUE of grassland lacked consistent patterns owing to the broadly-distributed location of grasslands among various climate patterns and both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Crop WUE is likely also sensitive to the variety of farming systems.

Bottom Line: One peak is located at 20° ~ 30°N and the other extends a little farther north than 51°N.Finally, long-term spatiotemporal trend analysis using satellite-based remote sensing data reveals that land-cover and land-use change in recent years has led to a decline in global WUE.Our study provides a new framework for global research on the interactions between carbon and water cycles as well as responses to natural and human impacts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.

ABSTRACT
A better understanding of ecosystem water-use efficiency (WUE) will help us improve ecosystem management for mitigation as well as adaption to global hydrological change. Here, long-term flux tower observations of productivity and evapotranspiration allow us to detect a consistent latitudinal trend in WUE, rising from the subtropics to the northern high-latitudes. The trend peaks at approximately 51°N, and then declines toward higher latitudes. These ground-based observations are consistent with global-scale estimates of WUE. Global analysis of WUE reveals existence of strong regional variations that correspond to global climate patterns. The latitudinal trends of global WUE for Earth's major plant functional types reveal two peaks in the Northern Hemisphere not detected by ground-based measurements. One peak is located at 20° ~ 30°N and the other extends a little farther north than 51°N. Finally, long-term spatiotemporal trend analysis using satellite-based remote sensing data reveals that land-cover and land-use change in recent years has led to a decline in global WUE. Our study provides a new framework for global research on the interactions between carbon and water cycles as well as responses to natural and human impacts.

Show MeSH