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Mate choice and body pattern variations in the Crown Butterfly fish Chaetodon paucifasciatus (Chaetodontidae).

Levy K, Lerner A, Shashar N - Biol Open (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that the patterns of each fish and sides of the body were no less dissimilar, compared intraspecificly to other fish, and that each side pattern was unique and distinguishable.Individuals were mainly attracted to conspecifics with multiple crossing patterns (two or more consecutive crossings), and rejected patterns with holes.Our results suggest that in this species the unique body pattern of each fish is used for conspecific identification of mates and intruders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Eilat Campus, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel mpkeren@gmx.ch.

No MeSH data available.


Feature location and frequency of appearance in the body pattern of the C. paucifasciatus from head to tail (stripe numbers 1–8, respectively; n  =  42 patterns).(A) Black vertical stripes, (B) crossings, (C) holes, and (D) splits. Note that the scale in (C) and (D) goes up to 50% only. In each subset, dorsal, middle, and ventral sections are represented by the three panels from top to bottom, respectively. Note the 100% appearance of stripes three through five in all three sections (A).
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f03: Feature location and frequency of appearance in the body pattern of the C. paucifasciatus from head to tail (stripe numbers 1–8, respectively; n  =  42 patterns).(A) Black vertical stripes, (B) crossings, (C) holes, and (D) splits. Note that the scale in (C) and (D) goes up to 50% only. In each subset, dorsal, middle, and ventral sections are represented by the three panels from top to bottom, respectively. Note the 100% appearance of stripes three through five in all three sections (A).

Mentions: The frequency of appearance (percentage of patterns in which the feature appeared out of the total of 42 patterns examined) of each of the four features, in each dorsal-ventral section, is presented in Fig. 3. The number of stripes in a pattern varied from six to eight. The four middle stripes (stripes 2–5) were present in all fish examined, in full length (100% of each section), while the other, peripheral stripes, existed with some variation: the first anterior stripe was found mainly in the upper section, while the eighth stripe appeared only occasionally, in the ventral (5%) and middle (24%) sections. The distribution of holes, crossings and splits over all eight stripes was found to be different from random (χ2 test, p < 0.009 for each feature): holes were more common in the sixth and seventh stripes (26% and 30%, respectively), splits were most common in the fourth stripe (19%), and crossings were most common in stripes six, seven, and eight (52%, 62% and 19%, respectively). These results show that the sixth and seventh stripes contain the most variation in the C. paucifasciatus body patterns (88% and 98%, respectively; Fig. 4).


Mate choice and body pattern variations in the Crown Butterfly fish Chaetodon paucifasciatus (Chaetodontidae).

Levy K, Lerner A, Shashar N - Biol Open (2014)

Feature location and frequency of appearance in the body pattern of the C. paucifasciatus from head to tail (stripe numbers 1–8, respectively; n  =  42 patterns).(A) Black vertical stripes, (B) crossings, (C) holes, and (D) splits. Note that the scale in (C) and (D) goes up to 50% only. In each subset, dorsal, middle, and ventral sections are represented by the three panels from top to bottom, respectively. Note the 100% appearance of stripes three through five in all three sections (A).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265763&req=5

f03: Feature location and frequency of appearance in the body pattern of the C. paucifasciatus from head to tail (stripe numbers 1–8, respectively; n  =  42 patterns).(A) Black vertical stripes, (B) crossings, (C) holes, and (D) splits. Note that the scale in (C) and (D) goes up to 50% only. In each subset, dorsal, middle, and ventral sections are represented by the three panels from top to bottom, respectively. Note the 100% appearance of stripes three through five in all three sections (A).
Mentions: The frequency of appearance (percentage of patterns in which the feature appeared out of the total of 42 patterns examined) of each of the four features, in each dorsal-ventral section, is presented in Fig. 3. The number of stripes in a pattern varied from six to eight. The four middle stripes (stripes 2–5) were present in all fish examined, in full length (100% of each section), while the other, peripheral stripes, existed with some variation: the first anterior stripe was found mainly in the upper section, while the eighth stripe appeared only occasionally, in the ventral (5%) and middle (24%) sections. The distribution of holes, crossings and splits over all eight stripes was found to be different from random (χ2 test, p < 0.009 for each feature): holes were more common in the sixth and seventh stripes (26% and 30%, respectively), splits were most common in the fourth stripe (19%), and crossings were most common in stripes six, seven, and eight (52%, 62% and 19%, respectively). These results show that the sixth and seventh stripes contain the most variation in the C. paucifasciatus body patterns (88% and 98%, respectively; Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: We found that the patterns of each fish and sides of the body were no less dissimilar, compared intraspecificly to other fish, and that each side pattern was unique and distinguishable.Individuals were mainly attracted to conspecifics with multiple crossing patterns (two or more consecutive crossings), and rejected patterns with holes.Our results suggest that in this species the unique body pattern of each fish is used for conspecific identification of mates and intruders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Eilat Campus, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel mpkeren@gmx.ch.

No MeSH data available.