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Oxidative Stress: A Link between Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontal Disease.

Monea A, Mezei T, Popsor S, Monea M - Int J Endocrinol (2014)

Bottom Line: Our results showed that periodontal tissues in patients with T2D present significant inflammation, affecting both epithelial and connective tissues.Diabetic subjects had higher MDA levels in their periodontal tissues, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation in T2D, and decreased GSH tissue levels, suggesting an alteration of the local antioxidant defense mechanism.These results are in concordance with the histological changes that we found in periodontal tissues of diabetic subjects, confirming the hypothesis of OS implication, as a correlation between periodontal disease incidence and T2D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Odontology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Târgu Mureș, 38 Gheorghe Marinescu Street, 540114 Târgu Mureș, Romania.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To investigate oxidative stress (OS) and histological changes that occur in the periodontium of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without signs of periodontal disease and to establish if oxidative stress is a possible link between diabetes mellitus and periodontal changes. Materials and Methods. Tissue samples from ten adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and eight healthy adults were harvested. The specimens were examined by microscope using standard hematoxylin-eosin stain, at various magnifications, and investigated for tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Results. Our results showed that periodontal tissues in patients with T2D present significant inflammation, affecting both epithelial and connective tissues. Mean MDA tissue levels were 3.578 ± 0.60 SD in diabetics versus 0.406 ± 0.27 SD in controls (P < 0.0001), while mean GSH tissue levels were 2.48 ± 1.02 SD in diabetics versus 9.7875 ± 2.42 SD in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Diabetic subjects had higher MDA levels in their periodontal tissues, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation in T2D, and decreased GSH tissue levels, suggesting an alteration of the local antioxidant defense mechanism. These results are in concordance with the histological changes that we found in periodontal tissues of diabetic subjects, confirming the hypothesis of OS implication, as a correlation between periodontal disease incidence and T2D.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly chronic in the lamina propria and with granulocytes within the epithelium (H&E stain, 20x).
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fig4: Polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly chronic in the lamina propria and with granulocytes within the epithelium (H&E stain, 20x).

Mentions: Histological alterations in tissue sections obtained from diabetic patients were present in both the epithelium and the lamina propria of the gingival mucosa. The epithelium displayed variable amounts of acanthosis and parakeratosis, with reduced quantities of acute inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (segmented granulocytes) throughout its thickness and in superficially located microabscesses. A diffuse polymorphous inflammatory infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and, to a lesser extent, granulocytes was present in the mildly fibrotic lamina propria, displacing collagen fibers and surrounding ectatic blood vessels and exteriorized erythrocytes (Figures 3 and 4).


Oxidative Stress: A Link between Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontal Disease.

Monea A, Mezei T, Popsor S, Monea M - Int J Endocrinol (2014)

Polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly chronic in the lamina propria and with granulocytes within the epithelium (H&E stain, 20x).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265692&req=5

fig4: Polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly chronic in the lamina propria and with granulocytes within the epithelium (H&E stain, 20x).
Mentions: Histological alterations in tissue sections obtained from diabetic patients were present in both the epithelium and the lamina propria of the gingival mucosa. The epithelium displayed variable amounts of acanthosis and parakeratosis, with reduced quantities of acute inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (segmented granulocytes) throughout its thickness and in superficially located microabscesses. A diffuse polymorphous inflammatory infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and, to a lesser extent, granulocytes was present in the mildly fibrotic lamina propria, displacing collagen fibers and surrounding ectatic blood vessels and exteriorized erythrocytes (Figures 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: Our results showed that periodontal tissues in patients with T2D present significant inflammation, affecting both epithelial and connective tissues.Diabetic subjects had higher MDA levels in their periodontal tissues, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation in T2D, and decreased GSH tissue levels, suggesting an alteration of the local antioxidant defense mechanism.These results are in concordance with the histological changes that we found in periodontal tissues of diabetic subjects, confirming the hypothesis of OS implication, as a correlation between periodontal disease incidence and T2D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Odontology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Târgu Mureș, 38 Gheorghe Marinescu Street, 540114 Târgu Mureș, Romania.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To investigate oxidative stress (OS) and histological changes that occur in the periodontium of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without signs of periodontal disease and to establish if oxidative stress is a possible link between diabetes mellitus and periodontal changes. Materials and Methods. Tissue samples from ten adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and eight healthy adults were harvested. The specimens were examined by microscope using standard hematoxylin-eosin stain, at various magnifications, and investigated for tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Results. Our results showed that periodontal tissues in patients with T2D present significant inflammation, affecting both epithelial and connective tissues. Mean MDA tissue levels were 3.578 ± 0.60 SD in diabetics versus 0.406 ± 0.27 SD in controls (P < 0.0001), while mean GSH tissue levels were 2.48 ± 1.02 SD in diabetics versus 9.7875 ± 2.42 SD in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Diabetic subjects had higher MDA levels in their periodontal tissues, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation in T2D, and decreased GSH tissue levels, suggesting an alteration of the local antioxidant defense mechanism. These results are in concordance with the histological changes that we found in periodontal tissues of diabetic subjects, confirming the hypothesis of OS implication, as a correlation between periodontal disease incidence and T2D.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus