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Cerebral venous thrombosis in two patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

Garcia-Carreira MC, Vergé DC, Branera J, Zauner M, Herrero JE, Tió E, Perpinyà GR - Case Rep Neurol Med (2014)

Bottom Line: In one case, extensive cerebral venous thrombosis involved the superior sagittal sinus and multiple cortical cerebral veins.In the other case, only a right frontoparietal cortical vein was involved.However, we advocate aggressive treatment of the underlying cerebrospinal fluid leak.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Hospital de Sabadell, Corporació Sanitària i Universitària Parc Taulí (CSIUPT), 08208 Sabadell, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Although few patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension develop cerebral venous thrombosis, the association between these two entities seems too common to be simply a coincidental finding. We describe two cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension associated with cerebral venous thrombosis. In one case, extensive cerebral venous thrombosis involved the superior sagittal sinus and multiple cortical cerebral veins. In the other case, only a right frontoparietal cortical vein was involved. Several mechanisms could contribute to the development of cerebral venous thrombosis in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. When spontaneous intracranial hypotension and cerebral venous thrombosis occur together, it raises difficult practical questions about the treatment of these two conditions. In most reported cases, spontaneous intracranial hypotension was treated conservatively and cerebral venous thrombosis was treated with anticoagulation. However, we advocate aggressive treatment of the underlying cerebrospinal fluid leak.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT. ((a), (b)) Right frontoparietal subarachnoid hemorrhage. (c) Right parietal hematoma measuring 8 mm in diameter.
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fig2: CT. ((a), (b)) Right frontoparietal subarachnoid hemorrhage. (c) Right parietal hematoma measuring 8 mm in diameter.

Mentions: CT scan revealed right frontoparietal subarachnoid hemorrhage and a right parietal hematoma measuring 8 mm in diameter (reported as a probable venous malformation) (Figure 2). The patient was treated with nimodipine and transferred to our hospital for further tests.


Cerebral venous thrombosis in two patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

Garcia-Carreira MC, Vergé DC, Branera J, Zauner M, Herrero JE, Tió E, Perpinyà GR - Case Rep Neurol Med (2014)

CT. ((a), (b)) Right frontoparietal subarachnoid hemorrhage. (c) Right parietal hematoma measuring 8 mm in diameter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265689&req=5

fig2: CT. ((a), (b)) Right frontoparietal subarachnoid hemorrhage. (c) Right parietal hematoma measuring 8 mm in diameter.
Mentions: CT scan revealed right frontoparietal subarachnoid hemorrhage and a right parietal hematoma measuring 8 mm in diameter (reported as a probable venous malformation) (Figure 2). The patient was treated with nimodipine and transferred to our hospital for further tests.

Bottom Line: In one case, extensive cerebral venous thrombosis involved the superior sagittal sinus and multiple cortical cerebral veins.In the other case, only a right frontoparietal cortical vein was involved.However, we advocate aggressive treatment of the underlying cerebrospinal fluid leak.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Hospital de Sabadell, Corporació Sanitària i Universitària Parc Taulí (CSIUPT), 08208 Sabadell, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Although few patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension develop cerebral venous thrombosis, the association between these two entities seems too common to be simply a coincidental finding. We describe two cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension associated with cerebral venous thrombosis. In one case, extensive cerebral venous thrombosis involved the superior sagittal sinus and multiple cortical cerebral veins. In the other case, only a right frontoparietal cortical vein was involved. Several mechanisms could contribute to the development of cerebral venous thrombosis in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. When spontaneous intracranial hypotension and cerebral venous thrombosis occur together, it raises difficult practical questions about the treatment of these two conditions. In most reported cases, spontaneous intracranial hypotension was treated conservatively and cerebral venous thrombosis was treated with anticoagulation. However, we advocate aggressive treatment of the underlying cerebrospinal fluid leak.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus