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Diet and nutritional status among children 24-59 months by seasons in a mountainous area of Northern Vietnam in 2012.

Huong le T, Xuan le TT, Phuong le H, Huyen DT, Rocklöv J - Glob Health Action (2014)

Bottom Line: Most of the energy and the nutrient intakes during the four seasons did not meet the Vietnamese National Institute of Nutrition recommendation.Our study describes some seasonal variation in nutrition status and energy intake among children in a mountainous area northern Vietnam.Energy intake did not always meet national recommendations, especially in summer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam; lehuonghmu@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Seasonal variation affects food availability. However, it is not clear if it affects dietary intake and nutritional status of children in Vietnam.

Objectives: This paper aims at examining the seasonal variation in nutrition status and dietary intake of children aged 24-59 months.

Design: A repeated cross-sectional study design was used to collect data of changes in nutritional status and diets of children from 24 to 59 months through four seasons in Chiem Hoa district, Tuyen Quang province, a predominately rural mountainous province of northern Vietnam. The quantitative component includes anthropometric measurements, 24 hours dietary recall and socio-economic characteristics. The qualitative component was conducted through focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of the children surveyed in the quantitative component. The purpose of FGDs was to explore the food habits of children during the different seasons and the behaviours of their mothers in relation to the food that they provide during these seasons.

Results: The prevalence of underweight among children aged 24-59 months is estimated at around 20-25%; it peaked in summer (24.9%) and reached a low in winter (21.3%). The prevalence of stunting was highest in summer (29.8%) and lowest in winter (22.2%). The prevalence of wasting in children was higher in spring and autumn (14.3%) and lower in summer (9.3%). Energy intake of children was highest in the autumn (1259.3 kcal) and lowest in the summer (996.9 kcal). Most of the energy and the nutrient intakes during the four seasons did not meet the Vietnamese National Institute of Nutrition recommendation.

Conclusions: Our study describes some seasonal variation in nutrition status and energy intake among children in a mountainous area northern Vietnam. Our study indicated that the prevalence of stunting and underweight was higher in summer and autumn, while the prevalence of wasting was higher in spring and autumn. Energy intake did not always meet national recommendations, especially in summer.

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Average temperature of Tuyen Quang province in 2012 (15).
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Figure 0001: Average temperature of Tuyen Quang province in 2012 (15).

Mentions: There are four seasons in Tuyen Quang province: spring, summer, autumn and winter. The dry and cold winter lasts from November to February. The spring lasts from March to April; rainy hot summer lasts from May to August. Autumn lasts from September to October. Autumn and spring are the two short transitional seasons. The annual rainfall average of the region is normally in the interval of 1,295–2,266 mm; the average temperature varies from 26 to 29°C (Fig. 1), and the annual humidity average is around 85%. Resulting from geographic location, Tuyen Quang province is divided into two regions with different weather conditions; the northern part of this province, including Xuan Quang commune, where this study is carried out, has a longer winter, lower temperature and much more rainfall in summer (15).


Diet and nutritional status among children 24-59 months by seasons in a mountainous area of Northern Vietnam in 2012.

Huong le T, Xuan le TT, Phuong le H, Huyen DT, Rocklöv J - Glob Health Action (2014)

Average temperature of Tuyen Quang province in 2012 (15).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265645&req=5

Figure 0001: Average temperature of Tuyen Quang province in 2012 (15).
Mentions: There are four seasons in Tuyen Quang province: spring, summer, autumn and winter. The dry and cold winter lasts from November to February. The spring lasts from March to April; rainy hot summer lasts from May to August. Autumn lasts from September to October. Autumn and spring are the two short transitional seasons. The annual rainfall average of the region is normally in the interval of 1,295–2,266 mm; the average temperature varies from 26 to 29°C (Fig. 1), and the annual humidity average is around 85%. Resulting from geographic location, Tuyen Quang province is divided into two regions with different weather conditions; the northern part of this province, including Xuan Quang commune, where this study is carried out, has a longer winter, lower temperature and much more rainfall in summer (15).

Bottom Line: Most of the energy and the nutrient intakes during the four seasons did not meet the Vietnamese National Institute of Nutrition recommendation.Our study describes some seasonal variation in nutrition status and energy intake among children in a mountainous area northern Vietnam.Energy intake did not always meet national recommendations, especially in summer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam; lehuonghmu@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Seasonal variation affects food availability. However, it is not clear if it affects dietary intake and nutritional status of children in Vietnam.

Objectives: This paper aims at examining the seasonal variation in nutrition status and dietary intake of children aged 24-59 months.

Design: A repeated cross-sectional study design was used to collect data of changes in nutritional status and diets of children from 24 to 59 months through four seasons in Chiem Hoa district, Tuyen Quang province, a predominately rural mountainous province of northern Vietnam. The quantitative component includes anthropometric measurements, 24 hours dietary recall and socio-economic characteristics. The qualitative component was conducted through focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of the children surveyed in the quantitative component. The purpose of FGDs was to explore the food habits of children during the different seasons and the behaviours of their mothers in relation to the food that they provide during these seasons.

Results: The prevalence of underweight among children aged 24-59 months is estimated at around 20-25%; it peaked in summer (24.9%) and reached a low in winter (21.3%). The prevalence of stunting was highest in summer (29.8%) and lowest in winter (22.2%). The prevalence of wasting in children was higher in spring and autumn (14.3%) and lower in summer (9.3%). Energy intake of children was highest in the autumn (1259.3 kcal) and lowest in the summer (996.9 kcal). Most of the energy and the nutrient intakes during the four seasons did not meet the Vietnamese National Institute of Nutrition recommendation.

Conclusions: Our study describes some seasonal variation in nutrition status and energy intake among children in a mountainous area northern Vietnam. Our study indicated that the prevalence of stunting and underweight was higher in summer and autumn, while the prevalence of wasting was higher in spring and autumn. Energy intake did not always meet national recommendations, especially in summer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus