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Effect of Centella asiatica Leaf Extract on the Dietary Supplementation in Transgenic Drosophila Model of Parkinson's Disease.

Siddique YH, Naz F, Jyoti S, Fatima A, Khanam S - Parkinsons Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: C. asiatica extract at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL was mixed with the diet and the flies were allowed feeding on it for 24 days.The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, activity pattern, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione content, and glutathione-S-transferase activity in the brains of transgenic Drosophila.The exposure of extract to PD model flies results in a significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and activity pattern and reduced the oxidative stress (P < 0.05) in the brains of PD flies as compared to untreated PD flies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Drosophila Transgenic Laboratory, Section of Genetics, Department of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh 202002, India.

ABSTRACT
The role of Centella asiatica L. leaf extract was studied on the transgenic Drosophila model flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h-αS) in the neurons. The leaf extract was prepared in acetone and was subjected to GC-MS analysis. C. asiatica extract at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL was mixed with the diet and the flies were allowed feeding on it for 24 days. The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, activity pattern, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione content, and glutathione-S-transferase activity in the brains of transgenic Drosophila. The exposure of extract to PD model flies results in a significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and activity pattern and reduced the oxidative stress (P < 0.05) in the brains of PD flies as compared to untreated PD flies. The results suggest that C. asiatica leaf extract is potent in reducing the PD symptoms in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Climbing ability in Parkinson disease (PD) flies and control for a period of 24 days. The values are the mean of five assays (asignificant with respect to control P-0.01). Control flies: UAS-alpha-syn; PD flies: elav-GAL4; UAS-alpha-syn.
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fig3: Climbing ability in Parkinson disease (PD) flies and control for a period of 24 days. The values are the mean of five assays (asignificant with respect to control P-0.01). Control flies: UAS-alpha-syn; PD flies: elav-GAL4; UAS-alpha-syn.

Mentions: The compounds present in acetone extract of leaves of C. asiatica were identified by GC-MS analysis (Figure 1). The GC-MS chromatogram shows the presence of 8 major compounds with highest concentrations. Their retention times (RT), molecular formula, and molecular weight (MW) in the leaves of C. asiatica are presented in Table 1. The GC-MS analysis revealed that the acetone extract is mainly composed of β-elemene, benzene, 1,1′-oxybis, bicyclotrimethyl-8-methylene, α-humulene, α-cadinol, 2-hexadecen-1-ol, 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl, and neophytadiene. Figures 2(a)–2(g) show the fragmentation pattern of mass spectrum and structures of compounds extracted from the leaf extract and confirmed through NIST library of GC-MS. Those peaks matching similarity index (SI) greater than 70% in NIST library were assigned. Some of the major peaks are either column bleeding or impurities in plant extract. First the climbing assay was performed for the control and the PD flies. The climbing response of control flies did not change for the 24 days of evaluation but from the day 12, the response of the PD flies was significantly lowered as compare to the control (Figure 3; P < 0.05). Hence duration of treatment was selected for 24 days and the climbing assay was performed after 24 days of the exposure to various doses of C. asiatica extract. The exposure of PD flies to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract showed a dose-dependent significant delay in the loss of climbing ability (Figure 4; P < 0.05). The selected doses of C. asiatica did not show any effect on the climbing ability of the control flies (Figure 4). For studying the activity pattern the data collected by Drosophila Activity Monitor (DAM) was analyzed by chi-square periodogram. For control flies the number of significant peaks was more (Figures 5(a) and 5(b)) as compared to the PD flies (Figures 6(a) and 6(b)). A dose-dependent delay in the loss of activity pattern was observed in PD flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1 μL/mL of C. asiatica leaf extract (Figures 7(a), 7(b), 8(a), 8(b), 9(a), and 9(b)). No change in the activity pattern of control flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract was observed (Figures 10(a), 10(b), 11(a), 11(b), 12(a), and 12(b)). PD flies exposed to 10−3 M of dopamine also showed a delay in the loss of activity (Figures 13(a) and 13(b)). The results obtained for the lipid peroxidation are shown in (Figure 14). A dose-dependent significant decrease in the mean absorbance values for the estimation of lipid peroxidation was observed in the PD flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract as compared to untreated PD flies (Figure 14; P < 0.05). The exposure of the selected doses of C. asiatica extract did not show any increase in the mean absorbance values for the estimation of lipid peroxidation (Figure 14). The results obtained for the protein carbonyl content in the brain of PD flies are shown in (Figure 15). A dose-dependent decrease in the mean absorbance values for the estimation of protein carbonyl content was observed in the flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract as compared to untreated PD flies (Figure 15; P < 0.05). No increase in the protein carbonyl content was observed in the control flies exposed to selected doses of C. asiatica extract (Figure 15).


Effect of Centella asiatica Leaf Extract on the Dietary Supplementation in Transgenic Drosophila Model of Parkinson's Disease.

Siddique YH, Naz F, Jyoti S, Fatima A, Khanam S - Parkinsons Dis (2014)

Climbing ability in Parkinson disease (PD) flies and control for a period of 24 days. The values are the mean of five assays (asignificant with respect to control P-0.01). Control flies: UAS-alpha-syn; PD flies: elav-GAL4; UAS-alpha-syn.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265550&req=5

fig3: Climbing ability in Parkinson disease (PD) flies and control for a period of 24 days. The values are the mean of five assays (asignificant with respect to control P-0.01). Control flies: UAS-alpha-syn; PD flies: elav-GAL4; UAS-alpha-syn.
Mentions: The compounds present in acetone extract of leaves of C. asiatica were identified by GC-MS analysis (Figure 1). The GC-MS chromatogram shows the presence of 8 major compounds with highest concentrations. Their retention times (RT), molecular formula, and molecular weight (MW) in the leaves of C. asiatica are presented in Table 1. The GC-MS analysis revealed that the acetone extract is mainly composed of β-elemene, benzene, 1,1′-oxybis, bicyclotrimethyl-8-methylene, α-humulene, α-cadinol, 2-hexadecen-1-ol, 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl, and neophytadiene. Figures 2(a)–2(g) show the fragmentation pattern of mass spectrum and structures of compounds extracted from the leaf extract and confirmed through NIST library of GC-MS. Those peaks matching similarity index (SI) greater than 70% in NIST library were assigned. Some of the major peaks are either column bleeding or impurities in plant extract. First the climbing assay was performed for the control and the PD flies. The climbing response of control flies did not change for the 24 days of evaluation but from the day 12, the response of the PD flies was significantly lowered as compare to the control (Figure 3; P < 0.05). Hence duration of treatment was selected for 24 days and the climbing assay was performed after 24 days of the exposure to various doses of C. asiatica extract. The exposure of PD flies to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract showed a dose-dependent significant delay in the loss of climbing ability (Figure 4; P < 0.05). The selected doses of C. asiatica did not show any effect on the climbing ability of the control flies (Figure 4). For studying the activity pattern the data collected by Drosophila Activity Monitor (DAM) was analyzed by chi-square periodogram. For control flies the number of significant peaks was more (Figures 5(a) and 5(b)) as compared to the PD flies (Figures 6(a) and 6(b)). A dose-dependent delay in the loss of activity pattern was observed in PD flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1 μL/mL of C. asiatica leaf extract (Figures 7(a), 7(b), 8(a), 8(b), 9(a), and 9(b)). No change in the activity pattern of control flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract was observed (Figures 10(a), 10(b), 11(a), 11(b), 12(a), and 12(b)). PD flies exposed to 10−3 M of dopamine also showed a delay in the loss of activity (Figures 13(a) and 13(b)). The results obtained for the lipid peroxidation are shown in (Figure 14). A dose-dependent significant decrease in the mean absorbance values for the estimation of lipid peroxidation was observed in the PD flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract as compared to untreated PD flies (Figure 14; P < 0.05). The exposure of the selected doses of C. asiatica extract did not show any increase in the mean absorbance values for the estimation of lipid peroxidation (Figure 14). The results obtained for the protein carbonyl content in the brain of PD flies are shown in (Figure 15). A dose-dependent decrease in the mean absorbance values for the estimation of protein carbonyl content was observed in the flies exposed to 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL of C. asiatica extract as compared to untreated PD flies (Figure 15; P < 0.05). No increase in the protein carbonyl content was observed in the control flies exposed to selected doses of C. asiatica extract (Figure 15).

Bottom Line: C. asiatica extract at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL was mixed with the diet and the flies were allowed feeding on it for 24 days.The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, activity pattern, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione content, and glutathione-S-transferase activity in the brains of transgenic Drosophila.The exposure of extract to PD model flies results in a significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and activity pattern and reduced the oxidative stress (P < 0.05) in the brains of PD flies as compared to untreated PD flies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Drosophila Transgenic Laboratory, Section of Genetics, Department of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh 202002, India.

ABSTRACT
The role of Centella asiatica L. leaf extract was studied on the transgenic Drosophila model flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h-αS) in the neurons. The leaf extract was prepared in acetone and was subjected to GC-MS analysis. C. asiatica extract at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL was mixed with the diet and the flies were allowed feeding on it for 24 days. The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, activity pattern, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione content, and glutathione-S-transferase activity in the brains of transgenic Drosophila. The exposure of extract to PD model flies results in a significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and activity pattern and reduced the oxidative stress (P < 0.05) in the brains of PD flies as compared to untreated PD flies. The results suggest that C. asiatica leaf extract is potent in reducing the PD symptoms in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus