Limits...
An FMRI study of neuronal specificity in acupuncture: the multiacupoint siguan and its sham point.

Shan Y, Wang ZQ, Zhao ZL, Zhang M, Hao SL, Xu JY, Shan BC, Lu J, Li KC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Our study used a single block experimental design to avoid the influence of posteffects.Brain regions that were activated more by real acupuncture stimulation than by sham point acupuncture included somatosensory cortex (the superior parietal lobule and postcentral gyrus), limbic-paralimbic system (the calcarine gyrus, precuneus, cingulate cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus), visual-related cortex (the fusiform and occipital gyri), basal ganglia, and the cerebellum.In this way, our study suggests Siguan may elicit specific activities in human brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, 45 Changchunjie, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China ; Beijing Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Brain Informatics, Beijing 100053, China.

ABSTRACT
Clarifying the intrinsic mechanisms of acupuncture's clinical effects has recently been gaining popularity. Here, we choose the Siguan acupoint (a combination of bilateral LI4 and Liv3) and its sham point to evaluate multiacupoint specificity. Thirty-one healthy volunteers were randomly divided into real acupoint (21 subjects) and sham acupoint (10 subjects) groups. Our study used a single block experimental design to avoid the influence of posteffects. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired during acupuncture stimulation. Results showed extensive increase in neuronal activities with Siguan acupuncture and significant differences between stimulation at real and sham points. Brain regions that were activated more by real acupuncture stimulation than by sham point acupuncture included somatosensory cortex (the superior parietal lobule and postcentral gyrus), limbic-paralimbic system (the calcarine gyrus, precuneus, cingulate cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus), visual-related cortex (the fusiform and occipital gyri), basal ganglia, and the cerebellum. In this way, our study suggests Siguan may elicit specific activities in human brain.

No MeSH data available.


Brain regions activated by acupuncture stimulation at real acupoints. Left side of the images is the right side of the brain. P < 0.05 (AlphaSim correction).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265514&req=5

fig2: Brain regions activated by acupuncture stimulation at real acupoints. Left side of the images is the right side of the brain. P < 0.05 (AlphaSim correction).

Mentions: Compared with the resting-state, acupuncture at the real acupoints activated brain regions primarily in the left calcarine gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus (BA19), bilateral middle temporal gyrus (left BA 22), left inferior temporal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left superior medial prefrontal gyrus (left BA 10), right anterior cingulate cortex (right BA 10), left postcentral gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and the bilateral cerebellum (Crus 2 and VIII). This result is based on the anatomical location of the peak voxel in the activated cluster. When taking whole clusters into consideration, we also found higher activity in the right superior medial prefrontal gyrus (right BA 10), right calcarine gyrus, and the bilateral precuneus. The details of these regions are presented in Table 1 and Figure 2.


An FMRI study of neuronal specificity in acupuncture: the multiacupoint siguan and its sham point.

Shan Y, Wang ZQ, Zhao ZL, Zhang M, Hao SL, Xu JY, Shan BC, Lu J, Li KC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2014)

Brain regions activated by acupuncture stimulation at real acupoints. Left side of the images is the right side of the brain. P < 0.05 (AlphaSim correction).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265514&req=5

fig2: Brain regions activated by acupuncture stimulation at real acupoints. Left side of the images is the right side of the brain. P < 0.05 (AlphaSim correction).
Mentions: Compared with the resting-state, acupuncture at the real acupoints activated brain regions primarily in the left calcarine gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus (BA19), bilateral middle temporal gyrus (left BA 22), left inferior temporal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left superior medial prefrontal gyrus (left BA 10), right anterior cingulate cortex (right BA 10), left postcentral gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and the bilateral cerebellum (Crus 2 and VIII). This result is based on the anatomical location of the peak voxel in the activated cluster. When taking whole clusters into consideration, we also found higher activity in the right superior medial prefrontal gyrus (right BA 10), right calcarine gyrus, and the bilateral precuneus. The details of these regions are presented in Table 1 and Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Our study used a single block experimental design to avoid the influence of posteffects.Brain regions that were activated more by real acupuncture stimulation than by sham point acupuncture included somatosensory cortex (the superior parietal lobule and postcentral gyrus), limbic-paralimbic system (the calcarine gyrus, precuneus, cingulate cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus), visual-related cortex (the fusiform and occipital gyri), basal ganglia, and the cerebellum.In this way, our study suggests Siguan may elicit specific activities in human brain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, 45 Changchunjie, Xicheng District, Beijing 100053, China ; Beijing Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Brain Informatics, Beijing 100053, China.

ABSTRACT
Clarifying the intrinsic mechanisms of acupuncture's clinical effects has recently been gaining popularity. Here, we choose the Siguan acupoint (a combination of bilateral LI4 and Liv3) and its sham point to evaluate multiacupoint specificity. Thirty-one healthy volunteers were randomly divided into real acupoint (21 subjects) and sham acupoint (10 subjects) groups. Our study used a single block experimental design to avoid the influence of posteffects. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired during acupuncture stimulation. Results showed extensive increase in neuronal activities with Siguan acupuncture and significant differences between stimulation at real and sham points. Brain regions that were activated more by real acupuncture stimulation than by sham point acupuncture included somatosensory cortex (the superior parietal lobule and postcentral gyrus), limbic-paralimbic system (the calcarine gyrus, precuneus, cingulate cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus), visual-related cortex (the fusiform and occipital gyri), basal ganglia, and the cerebellum. In this way, our study suggests Siguan may elicit specific activities in human brain.

No MeSH data available.