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Implanting totally implantable venous access port via the internal jugular vein guided by ultrasonography is feasible and safe in patients with breast cancer.

Zhou J, Qian S, He W, Han G, Li H, Luo R - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: All TIVAPs were implanted successfully.Complications were observed in 65 (13.21%) patients.A TIVAP can be employed for chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition on the implantation day.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, No, 1838, Northern Guangzhou Road, 510515 Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. lihongsheng0102@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Because of long-term use for chemotherapy and fluid administration in cancer patients, a totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) has been advised as a feasible catheter. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) puncture for TIVAP implantation in patients with breast cancer.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 492 patients who underwent US-guided IJV puncture for TIVAP implantation at our oncology department between 2010 and 2013. Indications, surgical complications, and early and long-term complications were analyzed.

Results: All TIVAPs were implanted successfully. Indications for TIVAP were chemotherapy alone (88 patients), chemoradiotherapy (387 patients), surgery (12 patients), and parenteral nutrition (5 patients). Complications were observed in 65 (13.21%) patients. The median duration of the TIVAP was 359 days (range, 28 to 712 days) without damage to the port or catheter, or leakage of drugs outside of the port system.

Conclusions: A TIVAP can be employed for chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition on the implantation day. Using a US-guided IJV puncture to completely implant a TIVAP is feasible and safe in patients with breast cancer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier survival curve showing complication-free catheter duration over time for both study groups. RBC, complication of right breast cancer; LBC, complication of left breast cancer.
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Fig5: Kaplan-Meier survival curve showing complication-free catheter duration over time for both study groups. RBC, complication of right breast cancer; LBC, complication of left breast cancer.

Mentions: The distance between the left IJV or the left subclavian vein to the junction of the right atrium and SVC is greater than on the right side. The catheter length inserted into the body from the left side is longer than that from the right, which may cause more complications. However, in our study, the difference between the complications of right and left sides was not significant (Figure 5).Figure 5


Implanting totally implantable venous access port via the internal jugular vein guided by ultrasonography is feasible and safe in patients with breast cancer.

Zhou J, Qian S, He W, Han G, Li H, Luo R - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Kaplan-Meier survival curve showing complication-free catheter duration over time for both study groups. RBC, complication of right breast cancer; LBC, complication of left breast cancer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265500&req=5

Fig5: Kaplan-Meier survival curve showing complication-free catheter duration over time for both study groups. RBC, complication of right breast cancer; LBC, complication of left breast cancer.
Mentions: The distance between the left IJV or the left subclavian vein to the junction of the right atrium and SVC is greater than on the right side. The catheter length inserted into the body from the left side is longer than that from the right, which may cause more complications. However, in our study, the difference between the complications of right and left sides was not significant (Figure 5).Figure 5

Bottom Line: All TIVAPs were implanted successfully.Complications were observed in 65 (13.21%) patients.A TIVAP can be employed for chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition on the implantation day.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, No, 1838, Northern Guangzhou Road, 510515 Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. lihongsheng0102@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Because of long-term use for chemotherapy and fluid administration in cancer patients, a totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) has been advised as a feasible catheter. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) puncture for TIVAP implantation in patients with breast cancer.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 492 patients who underwent US-guided IJV puncture for TIVAP implantation at our oncology department between 2010 and 2013. Indications, surgical complications, and early and long-term complications were analyzed.

Results: All TIVAPs were implanted successfully. Indications for TIVAP were chemotherapy alone (88 patients), chemoradiotherapy (387 patients), surgery (12 patients), and parenteral nutrition (5 patients). Complications were observed in 65 (13.21%) patients. The median duration of the TIVAP was 359 days (range, 28 to 712 days) without damage to the port or catheter, or leakage of drugs outside of the port system.

Conclusions: A TIVAP can be employed for chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition on the implantation day. Using a US-guided IJV puncture to completely implant a TIVAP is feasible and safe in patients with breast cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus