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Community acquired Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus cerebral abscess in an 11-month old boy: a case study.

Mutale W, Sahay KM, Hartley J, Thompson D, Ratnasinghe D, Hudson L, Hulse E, Fellows G - BMC Res Notes (2014)

Bottom Line: We report a case of a previously well 11-month old boy of Indian origin who developed a parietal lobe abscess from PVL positive CA-MRSA.This case is one of the few described cases of brain abscess caused by PVL CA-MRSA in children.The unusual (insidious) presentation, the absence of a clear staphylococcal focus and the unexpected finding of a CA-MRSA in this patient highlight the challenges of managing such cases in clinical settings and the potential future risk to public health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, London, UK. wmutale@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Brain abscess are uncommon childhood infection. Brain abscess caused by Panton-Valentine Leukocidin positive Community acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus have never been reported in the United Kingdom.

Case presentation: We report a case of a previously well 11-month old boy of Indian origin who developed a parietal lobe abscess from PVL positive CA-MRSA.

Conclusion: This case is one of the few described cases of brain abscess caused by PVL CA-MRSA in children. The unusual (insidious) presentation, the absence of a clear staphylococcal focus and the unexpected finding of a CA-MRSA in this patient highlight the challenges of managing such cases in clinical settings and the potential future risk to public health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Initial post-op magnetic resonance imaging.
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Fig2: Initial post-op magnetic resonance imaging.

Mentions: An MRI brain, performed 2 days after the needle aspiration (Figure 2), showed considerable reduction in the size of the parieto-occipital abscess with persistence of the parafalcine collection. Given the clinical improvement and the established microbiological diagnosis no further surgery was performed and antibiotics were continued.Figure 2


Community acquired Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus cerebral abscess in an 11-month old boy: a case study.

Mutale W, Sahay KM, Hartley J, Thompson D, Ratnasinghe D, Hudson L, Hulse E, Fellows G - BMC Res Notes (2014)

Initial post-op magnetic resonance imaging.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265436&req=5

Fig2: Initial post-op magnetic resonance imaging.
Mentions: An MRI brain, performed 2 days after the needle aspiration (Figure 2), showed considerable reduction in the size of the parieto-occipital abscess with persistence of the parafalcine collection. Given the clinical improvement and the established microbiological diagnosis no further surgery was performed and antibiotics were continued.Figure 2

Bottom Line: We report a case of a previously well 11-month old boy of Indian origin who developed a parietal lobe abscess from PVL positive CA-MRSA.This case is one of the few described cases of brain abscess caused by PVL CA-MRSA in children.The unusual (insidious) presentation, the absence of a clear staphylococcal focus and the unexpected finding of a CA-MRSA in this patient highlight the challenges of managing such cases in clinical settings and the potential future risk to public health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, London, UK. wmutale@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Brain abscess are uncommon childhood infection. Brain abscess caused by Panton-Valentine Leukocidin positive Community acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal aureus have never been reported in the United Kingdom.

Case presentation: We report a case of a previously well 11-month old boy of Indian origin who developed a parietal lobe abscess from PVL positive CA-MRSA.

Conclusion: This case is one of the few described cases of brain abscess caused by PVL CA-MRSA in children. The unusual (insidious) presentation, the absence of a clear staphylococcal focus and the unexpected finding of a CA-MRSA in this patient highlight the challenges of managing such cases in clinical settings and the potential future risk to public health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus