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Hypercaloric diets with increased meal frequency, but not meal size, increase intrahepatic triglycerides: a randomized controlled trial.

Koopman KE, Caan MW, Nederveen AJ, Pels A, Ackermans MT, Fliers E, la Fleur SE, Serlie MJ - Hepatology (2014)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that a high meal frequency, compared to consuming large meals, is detrimental in the accumulation of intrahepatic and abdominal fat.Increasing meal frequency significantly increased IHTG (HFHS mean relative increase of 45%; P = 0.016 and HS mean relative increase of 110%; P = 0.047), whereas increasing meal size did not (2-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] size versus frequency P = 0.03).Abdominal fat increased in the HFHS-frequency group (+63.3 ± 42.8 mL; P = 0.004) and tended to increase in the HS-frequency group (+46.5 ± 50.7 mL; P = 0.08).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Ad libitum caloric intake and surplus caloric intake during the diet interventions. Data are presented as mean and SEM, average of the 6-week diet period. (a) ANOVA of total caloric intake: P = 0.11, F = 2.24. (B) Baseline BMI and BMI gain after the hypercaloric diets. Data are presented as mean and SEM group averages. (b) ANOVA BMI gain: P = 0.42, F = 0.97; (c) ANOVA BMI after the diet: P = 0.81, F = 0.32.
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fig02: (A) Ad libitum caloric intake and surplus caloric intake during the diet interventions. Data are presented as mean and SEM, average of the 6-week diet period. (a) ANOVA of total caloric intake: P = 0.11, F = 2.24. (B) Baseline BMI and BMI gain after the hypercaloric diets. Data are presented as mean and SEM group averages. (b) ANOVA BMI gain: P = 0.42, F = 0.97; (c) ANOVA BMI after the diet: P = 0.81, F = 0.32.

Mentions: Food intake and macronutrient composition during the hypercaloric interventions are presented in Table2 and Fig. 2A. In summary, ad libitum nutrient intake was similar between the four diet groups. There was no difference in carbohydrate and fat intake between both HS groups or between both HFHS groups. There were no side effects or adverse events reported by subjects on any of the four diets.


Hypercaloric diets with increased meal frequency, but not meal size, increase intrahepatic triglycerides: a randomized controlled trial.

Koopman KE, Caan MW, Nederveen AJ, Pels A, Ackermans MT, Fliers E, la Fleur SE, Serlie MJ - Hepatology (2014)

(A) Ad libitum caloric intake and surplus caloric intake during the diet interventions. Data are presented as mean and SEM, average of the 6-week diet period. (a) ANOVA of total caloric intake: P = 0.11, F = 2.24. (B) Baseline BMI and BMI gain after the hypercaloric diets. Data are presented as mean and SEM group averages. (b) ANOVA BMI gain: P = 0.42, F = 0.97; (c) ANOVA BMI after the diet: P = 0.81, F = 0.32.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265261&req=5

fig02: (A) Ad libitum caloric intake and surplus caloric intake during the diet interventions. Data are presented as mean and SEM, average of the 6-week diet period. (a) ANOVA of total caloric intake: P = 0.11, F = 2.24. (B) Baseline BMI and BMI gain after the hypercaloric diets. Data are presented as mean and SEM group averages. (b) ANOVA BMI gain: P = 0.42, F = 0.97; (c) ANOVA BMI after the diet: P = 0.81, F = 0.32.
Mentions: Food intake and macronutrient composition during the hypercaloric interventions are presented in Table2 and Fig. 2A. In summary, ad libitum nutrient intake was similar between the four diet groups. There was no difference in carbohydrate and fat intake between both HS groups or between both HFHS groups. There were no side effects or adverse events reported by subjects on any of the four diets.

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that a high meal frequency, compared to consuming large meals, is detrimental in the accumulation of intrahepatic and abdominal fat.Increasing meal frequency significantly increased IHTG (HFHS mean relative increase of 45%; P = 0.016 and HS mean relative increase of 110%; P = 0.047), whereas increasing meal size did not (2-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] size versus frequency P = 0.03).Abdominal fat increased in the HFHS-frequency group (+63.3 ± 42.8 mL; P = 0.004) and tended to increase in the HS-frequency group (+46.5 ± 50.7 mL; P = 0.08).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus